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Concern about RVing with Our Dogs

Blue_Devil
Explorer
Explorer
My husband and I want to purchase a travel trailer and camp with our dogs. Our dogs have a pack mentality and bark at other dogs and other animals scurrying at night. We thought about renting an RV to test the waters but dog friendly RV rentals are practically unheard of in our area, both at campgrounds and from individuals. RV rental places that are pet friendly are booked! I’d hate to spend all that money only to find out our dogs will be a nuisance to others. Does anyone have experience with their own dogs that may have been similar? Any advice, recommendations or suggestions would be very much appreciated. Thank you.
24 REPLIES 24

d1h
Nomad II
Nomad II

Take him along with you.😁

Relaxetator
Explorer
Explorer

Dogs, particularly irresponsible dog owners are making campgrounds unpleasant.  Staying at state campgrounds dogs are off leash and not always cleaned up after. My wife recently surrounded by four dogs off leash barking in a threatening manner.As a legal CCW carrier, it will be a sad day when I shoot your dog rather than being bitten.

We travel with a small cat and dog, there is nothing more irresponsible than a bad pet owner who lets them run and doesn't clean up dog doo after them (including fenced in dog run areas).  

2014 Wolf Creek 850SB
2012 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD 7,220# Truck/10,400# Camper Fully Loaded

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
toedtoes wrote:
It was a bit devilish... 🙂

But it beats the "leave then home" standard. The solution to a barking or uncontrolled dog isn't to leave them home. The solution is to put the work in and train them so they are no longer barking non-stop or uncontrollable.


"Wear them down" - a tired dog is generally a good dog! And make sure they have a "bomb-proof recall" - having your dog ALWAYS come, no matter what, can be a life saver.

I got into RVing so that our dogs could go with us, and they seem to enjoy the trips as much as we do.
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

toedtoes
Explorer II
Explorer II
It was a bit devilish... 🙂

But it beats the "leave then home" standard. The solution to a barking or uncontrolled dog isn't to leave them home. The solution is to put the work in and train them so they are no longer barking non-stop or uncontrollable.
1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
toedtoes wrote:

I get that. I just think trying in a tent when they are so reactive to outside stimuli is bound to fail so it isn't a good test.

I really think the OP needs to put in some effort at home to refocus the dogs first. If they can't do that then the dogs won't change their behavior at a campground.


OK -my suggestion WAS diabolical 😉 More of a test of "if your dogs have a "pack mentality" - who is the Alpha and can you control them??" and simply setting up a tent for a day, should show where the control problems lie without spending a fortune on an RV.
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

Crowe
Explorer
Explorer
toedtoes wrote:
Deb and Ed M wrote:
I had just suggested tent camping, to see how the dogs reacted to the experience; rather than rent - or even worse, buy an RV and then find out it won't work.


I get that. I just think trying in a tent when they are so reactive to outside stimuli is bound to fail so it isn't a good test.

I really think the OP needs to put in some effort at home to refocus the dogs first. If they can't do that then the dogs won't change their behavior at a campground.


X2

I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be

Douglas Adams

[purple]RV-less for now but our spirits are still on the open road. [/purple]

georgelesley
Explorer
Explorer
We used to have two dogs. When we left them alone in the rv we dropped all window shades and put the tv or some music on and the a/c fan for noise. We also put bark collars on them. We then would hang around for a few minutes when we left them to hear if they barked. The first few times we did this they barked. We would open the door and let them know this was not OK.

When we returned we asked around to find out if they barked. They did not according to neighbors in the end we did not even put the batteries in the bark collars, just putting them on their neck was enough to keep them quiet.
George 20 yr USAF & Lesley

toedtoes
Explorer II
Explorer II
Deb and Ed M wrote:
I had just suggested tent camping, to see how the dogs reacted to the experience; rather than rent - or even worse, buy an RV and then find out it won't work.


I get that. I just think trying in a tent when they are so reactive to outside stimuli is bound to fail so it isn't a good test.

I really think the OP needs to put in some effort at home to refocus the dogs first. If they can't do that then the dogs won't change their behavior at a campground.
1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
I had just suggested tent camping, to see how the dogs reacted to the experience; rather than rent - or even worse, buy an RV and then find out it won't work.
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

toedtoes
Explorer II
Explorer II
I agree. That's why I asked how many dogs the OP has. "Pack mentality" with two dogs can be completely different that "pack mentality" with three or more dogs.

I also think that a tent is not the way to go. Too many sounds and shadows to set the dogs off.

Unless the OP returns to provide more details on their dogs, we really can't say what will work or not.
1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

Crowe
Explorer
Explorer
What about tent camping? (Or even renting a cargo van and throwing some cots inside)? Right now, used-camper prices are soaring - I would hate to see you pay top dollar only to find out your gang just aren't "campers"?

How would this be any different? If the dogs bark at everything the type of accommodations so to speak isn't very relevant. What made the hair on the back of my neck stand up more than the barking question is the comment "pack mentality". I understand that can mean almost anything but it's a big concerning.

I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be

Douglas Adams

[purple]RV-less for now but our spirits are still on the open road. [/purple]

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
A good camping dog basically ignores everything beyond about a 5' perimeter of their "house". Strange people/pets/critters/kids - these are staples of camping. There ARE "fixes" - a no-bark collar that gives a buzz/shock to the barker is a good deterrent (the good ones start with a vibration, then escalate to a shock if the barking doesn't cease).

What about tent camping? (Or even renting a cargo van and throwing some cots inside)? Right now, used-camper prices are soaring - I would hate to see you pay top dollar only to find out your gang just aren't "campers"?
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

pconroy328
Explorer
Explorer
I just want to say Thank you for voicing your concern! That shows consideration that's sadly lacking these days.