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Looking for dog breed the travels well while Rving

mdcamping
Explorer
Explorer
Been awhile since I have been on this board.

DW wants a Dog, looking for ideas. Some background info: DW loves dogs, for me I can take them or leave them. In the past because of this we have settled for the smaller breeds.

Our last dog was a sheltie, we think we were very fortunate that the dog had such a good disposition. This said I would love to get the same breed but I have read they don't travel as well and we might not be as lucky with #2. What everyone's thoughts?

How about other smaller breeds that travel well?

Thanks
Mike
2022 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercrew GCWR 19,500 157WB
Payload 2476 Maxtow 13,800 3.73 Equalizer 4 Pt Sway Hitch
2017 Jayco Jay Flight 24RBS
Old TV, 07 Toyota Tacoma, Double Cab, Factory Tow Pkg, retired towing at 229K. (Son now owns truck)
64 REPLIES 64

doxiemom11
Explorer II
Explorer II
Please do not get a larger dog unless you are physically able to walk, play and exercise the dog. We see so many owned by people who are basically unable to walk more than a few feet for various reasons. Your companion deserves the best, so keep your physical limitations in mind when you choose a breed also.

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
I have 2 mini "Aussiedoodles". I'm partial to herding dogs because they listen and learn so well, and tend to not run off; and when you cross an Aussie withh a poodle, they become ridiculously-friendly (which is always a good thing when out-and-about) and they seldom shed, although need to be clipped. Ben is only 19 lbs and 13" tall; Jimmy is 15" and 33 lbs. They LOVE to travel and they're not barky. Their energy level is higher than a Shih-Tzu, for example, but nothing a simple 10-minute walk can't take the edge off and have them sleeping for a few hours 🙂
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

mdcamping
Explorer
Explorer
DutchmenSport wrote:
Dachshund (or 2 weiner dogs).... (We have 2 of them and a cat. They all absolutely love traveling and camping.



I don't dare show those piks to DW, as we would be getting a dog next week! :B

Mike
2022 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercrew GCWR 19,500 157WB
Payload 2476 Maxtow 13,800 3.73 Equalizer 4 Pt Sway Hitch
2017 Jayco Jay Flight 24RBS
Old TV, 07 Toyota Tacoma, Double Cab, Factory Tow Pkg, retired towing at 229K. (Son now owns truck)

Trekkar
Explorer
Explorer
We had a Cocker for many years that traveled well. Didn't bark, slept well, and loved to go. Whenever you opened the MH door, she was ready to go!
2014 Dodge Ram 1500
2021 Salem SFX 167RBK

PNW_Steve
Explorer
Explorer
That's an easy one for me....

I spent 6+ years on the road with Golden Retrievers. I would not hesitate to do it again. The hair is hard to avoid though. I lost my last Golden three years ago and I still find the stray dog hair around the house. I sure miss my kids.
2004.5 Dodge 3500 5.9 Cummins, NV5400, 5" turbo back stainless exhaust, Edger programmer & 22.5 Alcoa's
2002 Forest River 36 5th Wheel (staying home)
1992 Jayco 29 5th Wheel (Mexico veteran & headed back)
2002 "faux" Wanderlodge 40' My new toy....

DutchmenSport
Explorer
Explorer
Dachshund (or 2 weiner dogs).... (We have 2 of them and a cat. They all absolutely love traveling and camping.)




































Two hotdogs! The greatest! :B ...

mdcamping
Explorer
Explorer
guidry wrote:
Look at Cavaliers, they were bred to be lap dogs. Small and easy to please disposition. With any dog you decide on, get a professional trainer and it’ll make a world of difference!


Googled this breed, I will look into this one.

Mike
2022 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercrew GCWR 19,500 157WB
Payload 2476 Maxtow 13,800 3.73 Equalizer 4 Pt Sway Hitch
2017 Jayco Jay Flight 24RBS
Old TV, 07 Toyota Tacoma, Double Cab, Factory Tow Pkg, retired towing at 229K. (Son now owns truck)

JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
*

mdcamping
Explorer
Explorer
Pawz4me wrote:
My concern with another Sheltie would be that they are known for being one of the more vocal breeds, which of course can be challenging to deal with in a campground. And many I've met have been rather high strung. Although I will say that one of my best friends had one that I believe would have made an excellent RV dog. She was calm and easy going.

Good luck, and thank you for doing your homework!


yup, I felt we were lucky with our past Sheltie. I have read about sheltie's and they seem to trend towards being on the hyperactive side, I'm thinking ours was the exception.

I'm no dog expert so please keep the ideas coming! 🙂

Mike
2022 F-150 3.5 EcoBoost 4X4 Supercrew GCWR 19,500 157WB
Payload 2476 Maxtow 13,800 3.73 Equalizer 4 Pt Sway Hitch
2017 Jayco Jay Flight 24RBS
Old TV, 07 Toyota Tacoma, Double Cab, Factory Tow Pkg, retired towing at 229K. (Son now owns truck)

JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
romore wrote:
. It is not so much the breed as the individual dog's temperament which varies a lot. My current Shih-Tzu does not like riding in the vehicle yet friends have the same breed with no problems.


We had 3 Shih tzus at the same time. 2 loved to ride, the other would rather stay, if somebody would stay with. All going, she was in a race to get in. But she loved to camp.

JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
-*

guidry
Explorer
Explorer
Look at Cavaliers, they were bred to be lap dogs. Small and easy to please disposition. With any dog you decide on, get a professional trainer and it’ll make a world of difference!

gbopp
Explorer
Explorer
When you mention Chihuahua, most people think of a yipping, yapping annoying little dog.
We inherited one, it's very quiet and likes everyone. She travels well and is no problem.

It's the temperament of the dog. Not just the breed.
One thing to consider is the size of the animal you are considering. Some CG's have weight limits along with breed limits.
Don't buy a dog from a breeder. Go to a couple animal shelters and see what is available. There are a lot of really good dogs of all breeds that need a home.

Pawz4me
Explorer
Explorer
I agree that much has to do with the individual dog's personality, and the level and type of socialization the dog receives. You certainly can overcome negative experiences, but most people don't want to have to do that, and especially if they haven't had significant dog experience. And I think it's good to stack the deck in your own favor. All that said --

Our Shih Tzu is an excellent traveler. They're low energy and are commonly said to be the least barky of the toy breeds (which is absolutely true for him--he's a very quiet dog). He gets in the RV, curls up and goes to sleep. He's always eager to explore wherever we stop, but when we hit the road again he goes back to sleep. He almost never barks. He's very friendly to people and other dogs, but mostly he only really cares about me and so doesn't see the need to be bothered by other stuff. He only needs short walks for exercise, so it's not hard to tire him out for travel or when we'll be out sightseeing. Although he doesn't *need* a lot of exercise, in good (cool) weather he can easily handle three to four mile walks or hikes. You do have to be very careful with them in hot weather, though. So a good genny and AC is a must when traveling in the summer in most areas.

And this is perhaps an exception, but our former beagle was a very good traveler. She'd also curl up and go to sleep as soon as we hit the road, and rarely barked. She was pretty darn lazy.

My concern with another Sheltie would be that they are known for being one of the more vocal breeds, which of course can be challenging to deal with in a campground. And many I've met have been rather high strung. Although I will say that one of my best friends had one that I believe would have made an excellent RV dog. She was calm and easy going.

Good luck, and thank you for doing your homework!
Me, DH and Yogi (Shih Tzu)
2017 Winnebago Travato 59K

toedtoes
Explorer III
Explorer III
Crowe wrote:
More critical than the breed is the dog's socialization very early in life to different situations.

Most definitely. While you can make SOME generalizations it's mostly up to you. Ran into a woman with a Springer a few months ago and the dog was not aggressive but not comfortable meeting new people. Mine will knock you over trying to get your attention. I'd be more concerned with temperament and personality than breed.


I agree with this. It's the temperament that matters.

And remember that if the temperament is right, you can overcome a negative experience. I fostered a young adult mix. She got car sick every day I had her. I adopted her out and she got car sick every day for a year. When I saw them two years later, they were fulltiming and traveling all over the continent. She no longer got car sick.
1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)