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light weight travel trailer - NO BO 19.5

3_dog_nights
Explorer
Explorer
Going to look at one tomorrow. Pro's Con's?? Main concern is single axle. Towing with Honda Ridgeline (500 tongue/5000 max)
Bob & Lynn
2 Chihuahua's, Ella, Gracie

was-2013 Open Range 424RLS,06' Chevy 3500, dually, Duramax/Allison

also was - 2015 Winnebago Adventurer 37F, towing 2003 Jeep Wrangler

now - 2021 NoBo 19.5, 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL (Talk about downsizing!)
14 REPLIES 14

3_dog_nights
Explorer
Explorer
Was looking at the Nano 213rds, liked it, but none available this side of the country. Dealer told me 3-4 month production date. So went with the No-Bo.
Bob & Lynn
2 Chihuahua's, Ella, Gracie

was-2013 Open Range 424RLS,06' Chevy 3500, dually, Duramax/Allison

also was - 2015 Winnebago Adventurer 37F, towing 2003 Jeep Wrangler

now - 2021 NoBo 19.5, 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL (Talk about downsizing!)

badercubed
Explorer
Explorer
If you want something light and with a dual axle, check out an Apex Nano 203RBK.

We love our 208BHS and it tows great behind our midsize truck.
2019 Apex Nano 208BHS
2016 F-150 Crew Cab (it's my wife's ride)

Been camping for 37 of my 38 years!

Deb_and_Ed_M
Explorer
Explorer
My son has the smaller NoBo, and pulls it with an F-150. Says it sways a bit; but in his case, the tail isn't big enough/heavy enough to wag the dog. He REALLY likes the versatility of the trailer!
Ed, Deb, and 2 dogs
Looking for a small Class C!

GrandpaKip
Explorer
Explorer
3 dog nights wrote:
IIRC, Ridgeline manual says WD is "not recommended" I've read the manual and it say nothing about WD hitch's. Again, I think this was the gen 1, not the gen 2.
as an aside, isn't interesting how the thread has digressed to single vs duel axle?

Ummm....you did say single axle was a concern.
Getting up to about 20 feet, I would be concerned, also, unless it was a 5000# axle.
Single vs. dual. I’ve had 2 singles and 2 duals. Never really noticed any ride difference.
If you are planning on boondocking, tank size would be a concern, too.
Kip
2015 Skyline Dart 214RB
2018 Silverado Double Cab 4x4
Andersen Hitch

3_dog_nights
Explorer
Explorer
IIRC, Ridgeline manual says WD is "not recommended" I've read the manual and it say nothing about WD hitch's. Again, I think this was the gen 1, not the gen 2.
as an aside, isn't interesting how the thread has digressed to single vs duel axle?
Bob & Lynn
2 Chihuahua's, Ella, Gracie

was-2013 Open Range 424RLS,06' Chevy 3500, dually, Duramax/Allison

also was - 2015 Winnebago Adventurer 37F, towing 2003 Jeep Wrangler

now - 2021 NoBo 19.5, 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL (Talk about downsizing!)

goducks10
Explorer
Explorer
Having just 2 trailer tires wouldn't bother me one bit. Heck I rode motorcycles for 12 years straight. 3 years while towing a DIY cargo trailer from Or to Co and all over the west coast. Riding an MC you don't have a spare. At least you have a spare with a single axle TT. 🙂

BarabooBob
Explorer III
Explorer III
I pull a single axle 3500 gross weight single axle. I have never had a problem with porpoising. My heavy tow F150 does not need a WDH but the truck is longer than the TT and has a high capacity.
Bob & Dawn Married 34 years
2017 Viking 17RD
2011 Ford F150 3.5L Ecoboost 420 lb/ft
Retired

rexlion
Explorer
Explorer
IIRC, Ridgeline manual says WD is "not recommended" but the reasons it gives have nothing to do with receiver attachment or structural integrity; nor is WD forbidden, just "not recommended." But really, the up-down chucking at the ball is not bad unless you're on a bad highway like with constant, uneven expansion joints.

I prefer single axle to tandem. Worst chucking I ever felt was with a rented tandem u-haul trailer! But the big reason is my experience with tires; seemed like the front tire would throw highway-litter nails or screws into perfect position for the rear tires to be stabbed. I have about 1/5 as many punctures now with single axle trailers.

Big thing to check, though, is the load carrying capacity of a single axle TT. Some of them only allow 400, 500, maybe 800 lbs of cargo. That isn't much when you figure what water, battery, and LP weigh. Also, if the TT is 19' or longer, and if it's really low to the ground, the rear can drag when you go into a gas station or some similar place with a rise or dip; flipping the axle can sometimes be a remedy for these.
Mike G.
Liberty is meaningless where the right to utter one's thoughts and opinions has ceased to exist. That, of all rights, is the dread of tyrants. --Frederick Douglass
photo: Yosemite Valley view from Taft Point

JIMNLIN
Explorer
Explorer
theoldwizard1 wrote:
Single axle trailer tend to "porpoise"/"hobby horse".

Yeah I found out the hard way after trying two single axle cargo trailer as job site tool trailers. Sold both and went with 7k tandem axle (3500 lb axles) cargo trailers and no more bucking/chucking/porpoise issues. Another plus was two axle braking.
"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

'03 2500 QC Dodge/Cummins HO 3.73 6 speed manual Jacobs Westach
'97 Park Avanue 28' 5er 11200 two slides

Bumpyroad
Explorer
Explorer
my TT is single axle. no issues for me, cost 50% to maintain.
bumpy

3_dog_nights
Explorer
Explorer
The Gen one Honda was unibody, the gen two is not. at least I don't think so...
Bob & Lynn
2 Chihuahua's, Ella, Gracie

was-2013 Open Range 424RLS,06' Chevy 3500, dually, Duramax/Allison

also was - 2015 Winnebago Adventurer 37F, towing 2003 Jeep Wrangler

now - 2021 NoBo 19.5, 2019 Honda Ridgeline RTL (Talk about downsizing!)

Lwiddis
Explorer
Explorer
Tandem is safer when a tire blows. Easier to change with a ramp too.
Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2022 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, WindyNation 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AH Lithium battery. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist. 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad

jdc1
Explorer II
Explorer II
theoldwizard1 wrote:
Single axle trailer tend to "porpoise"/"hobby horse".


Agreed. You would need sway control. I don't think your uni-body construction allows for a weight distribution hitch.

theoldwizard1
Explorer
Explorer
Single axle trailer tend to "porpoise"/"hobby horse".