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Reasonably decent towed vehicles for a Class A

TomNLauraWA
Explorer
Explorer
What are some reasonably priced vehicles suitable for flat towing behind a Coachmen Mirada 32ss? I know several Jeep products are suitable along with most manual transmission vehicles but it would help me choose a vehicle if I could get recommendations from others with Class A rigs. We just bought a new-to-us Mirada and are looking for a suitable toad.
2019 Coachmen Mirada 32ss
RVing since 2007

Previous rig:
2004 Skyline Nomad trailer
2005 Suburban
18 REPLIES 18

TomNLauraWA
Explorer
Explorer
Ponderosa wrote:
TomNLauraWA wrote:
Thank you very much to all of you who've given me your thoughts and advice. I deeply appreciate hearing from each of you about this as it helps me better to decide what I want to do and how to go about it. I'm pretty sure I won't be DIYing this, though. I'd much prefer to have it professionally set up initially. I'm also very open to used vehicles since this new-to-me motorhome is used. I think we've bought two new vehicles in our lives. We tend to buy well-maintained used vehicles because they frankly hold their value better depending on what they are and they're usually far less expensive. You do have to do your homework with them, though.

For those who tow with dollies or trailers, do you find that you have trouble fitting into or finding places to stay that have extra room for the dolly or trailer? Does it complicate finding a place to stay? I'm not averse to towing trailers as that's the rig we have right this minute (we bought the motorhome in Florida which is where it is right now and we're in WA). We're both very, very experienced with towing trailers but not with a motorhome, yet.

Thank you everyone for your kind and valuable words. I appreciate it! BTW this is Laura. Tom doesn't post here. I'm more the RVer than he is but he goes along for the ride.
I towed on a dolly for a couple years cross country trips. I never had a problem finding a place to put it in a camping spot. When hooked up it is no longer than a flat tow and mine slid right up under the back of the rv for storage taking up maybe two extra feet.

The main complaint I had with it was keeping the wheel tie down straps tight. At first, it took several stops right after hooking up to get it really snug. I learned you really have to crank that ratchet. If I had to do it again I would try an electric impact wrench!



Now THAT is good to know. Seriously, if we go with a dolly, I'll make sure to have the proper tool to tighten down the tie straps thanks to your post. 🙂
2019 Coachmen Mirada 32ss
RVing since 2007

Previous rig:
2004 Skyline Nomad trailer
2005 Suburban

Ponderosa
Explorer
Explorer
TomNLauraWA wrote:
Thank you very much to all of you who've given me your thoughts and advice. I deeply appreciate hearing from each of you about this as it helps me better to decide what I want to do and how to go about it. I'm pretty sure I won't be DIYing this, though. I'd much prefer to have it professionally set up initially. I'm also very open to used vehicles since this new-to-me motorhome is used. I think we've bought two new vehicles in our lives. We tend to buy well-maintained used vehicles because they frankly hold their value better depending on what they are and they're usually far less expensive. You do have to do your homework with them, though.

For those who tow with dollies or trailers, do you find that you have trouble fitting into or finding places to stay that have extra room for the dolly or trailer? Does it complicate finding a place to stay? I'm not averse to towing trailers as that's the rig we have right this minute (we bought the motorhome in Florida which is where it is right now and we're in WA). We're both very, very experienced with towing trailers but not with a motorhome, yet.

Thank you everyone for your kind and valuable words. I appreciate it! BTW this is Laura. Tom doesn't post here. I'm more the RVer than he is but he goes along for the ride.
I towed on a dolly for a couple years cross country trips. I never had a problem finding a place to put it in a camping spot. When hooked up it is no longer than a flat tow and mine slid right up under the back of the rv for storage taking up maybe two extra feet.

The main complaint I had with it was keeping the wheel tie down straps tight. At first, it took several stops right after hooking up to get it really snug. I learned you really have to crank that ratchet. If I had to do it again I would try an electric impact wrench!
2015 Thor Windsport 32N

ferndaleflyer
Explorer
Explorer
As I said before, do what suits you. I have dollied and trailered all over the country and have never unhooked the trailer or dolly. But I also never rely on state, or federal parks. There may be some restrictions but I have never encountered them

stripit
Explorer
Explorer
I own a Tesla and would like to take it with us on the trips we take. But you can't flat tow so it has to be on a trailer. That makes taking it along a problem as a trailer has to be purchased. Then not all rv parks are set up for ease of parking the motorhome and trailer. I do see many trailers behind MH's but it just isn't something we are wanting to do at this time. Flat towing the car we do take is Sooo easy.
Stacey Frank
2016 Tiffin Allegro Bus 40AP
2019 Tesla Model X
2015 Cadillac SRX we Tow
1991 Avanti Convertible

Grit_dog
Explorer III
Explorer III
^I’d say 4 down towing is the most convenient overall.
Dolly is the simplest if you don’t have a 4 down capable vehicle but could dolly it.
Trailer would be my last choice.
The challenges or lack there of are exactly what you’d imagine having towing experience already.
But since you don’t have a toad yet (unless you’re considering a current vehicle that could be dollied) it seems to make the most sense to find a 4 down towable vehicle.
That said, I’ve flat towed many vehicles (not day in day out behind a RV but it’s the same).
If I was doing that today, class A and a 4 down toad, I’d find the best used TJ Jeep that suited me and my budget, slap a tow bar on the front and some mag mount tail lights and that would be my permanent setup.
Maybe wire in the lights eventually or add a couple aux tail lights.
But I’m not paranoid about brakes with a lightweight vehicle behind a big ole Moho.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

TomNLauraWA
Explorer
Explorer
Thank you very much to all of you who've given me your thoughts and advice. I deeply appreciate hearing from each of you about this as it helps me better to decide what I want to do and how to go about it. I'm pretty sure I won't be DIYing this, though. I'd much prefer to have it professionally set up initially. I'm also very open to used vehicles since this new-to-me motorhome is used. I think we've bought two new vehicles in our lives. We tend to buy well-maintained used vehicles because they frankly hold their value better depending on what they are and they're usually far less expensive. You do have to do your homework with them, though.

For those who tow with dollies or trailers, do you find that you have trouble fitting into or finding places to stay that have extra room for the dolly or trailer? Does it complicate finding a place to stay? I'm not averse to towing trailers as that's the rig we have right this minute (we bought the motorhome in Florida which is where it is right now and we're in WA). We're both very, very experienced with towing trailers but not with a motorhome, yet.

Thank you everyone for your kind and valuable words. I appreciate it! BTW this is Laura. Tom doesn't post here. I'm more the RVer than he is but he goes along for the ride.
2019 Coachmen Mirada 32ss
RVing since 2007

Previous rig:
2004 Skyline Nomad trailer
2005 Suburban

CA_Traveler
Explorer III
Explorer III
stripit wrote:
A lot will depend on how comfortable you want to be once you unhook whatever it is your towing and drive around. We looked at a lot of smaller vehicles and decided on comfort, so bought a 2015 Cadillac SRX in 2015. After setting it up with Blue Ox and a braking system, have had about 40,000 trouble free miles dragging it behind 4 different motorhomes.
Absolutely. We had an opportunity to buy the current toad all set up and did so. It big and heavy (5400) but fun on the beach etc. Only dropped GPH 0.1 vs the CRV but sometimes in life you just hold up the credit card.

Live moves on and we are going to sell the MH/car.
2009 Holiday Rambler 42' Scepter with ISL 400 Cummins
750 Watts Solar Morningstar MPPT 60 Controller
2014 Grand Cherokee Overland

Bob

stripit
Explorer
Explorer
A lot will depend on how comfortable you want to be once you unhook whatever it is your towing and drive around. We looked at a lot of smaller vehicles and decided on comfort, so bought a 2015 Cadillac SRX in 2015. After setting it up with Blue Ox and a braking system, have had about 40,000 trouble free miles dragging it behind 4 different motorhomes.
Stacey Frank
2016 Tiffin Allegro Bus 40AP
2019 Tesla Model X
2015 Cadillac SRX we Tow
1991 Avanti Convertible

haste_maker
Explorer
Explorer
I am towing a 2003 Honda Element that I brought new, I have towed it over 10,000 miles to date without any problems, it now has 221,000 miles on it, not including miles towed...I know this isn't any thing fancy or a high priced Jeep, but you may want to check out used Honda Element's..
Retried Teamster
2007 Allergo

willald
Explorer
Explorer
As you're seeing here, everybody is going to recommend what they tow or have towed with. Soo, I'll just do the same, haha:

The Ford Taurus that Ford built up until 2019, provided it has the V6 engine, is flat towable (and its automatic). Also, the Ford Fusion Hybrids that were also built until around 2019, can be flat towed. I've towed both of those and they both work great.

Now, if you want something fun to drive, and very simple to flat tow, been around forever and still being built new today, look no further than a Jeep Wrangler. Thats what we tow now, and it is the simplest to tow I've ever owned. Setting it up to tow was the easiest, too (Jeep is only vehicle I've owned that I was able to do all the towing setup myself, didn't have to hire a mechanic). It is the most fun, too. 🙂

As already said, the choices for new vehicles that are flat towable keeps getting slimmer and slimmer. If you're willing to buy a used vehicle, you will have a lot more choices.

Good luck, whatever you decide.
Will and Cheryl
2021 Newmar Baystar 3014 on F53 (7.3 V8) Chassis ("Brook")
2018 Jeep Wrangler JK ("Wilbur")

Blaster_Man
Explorer
Explorer
CA Traveler wrote:
...CRV up to 2014 can be towed. The 2014 can be towed as well. All CRVs (FWD and AWD) can be towed four down.
Flat towing also involves a tow bar, base plate, aux brake, lights and possible charging line...


I'm towing my second CRV, great tow vehicles.
2014 American Eagle

ferndaleflyer
Explorer
Explorer
I tow a Smart car. I have one set up with the Roadmaster deal so it can be flat towed and one that is not. I thought the Roadmaster deal was the way to go after reading about it forever but have only used it a couple of times as it takes to long to hook up and the first time I used it the "death wobble" got me. So, I use a dolly which allows me to tow any of our cars that are front wheel drive and takes no time to hook up. I also have a Featherlite car trailer if I want to take something else. I am also 82+ years old. Get what suits YOU and get on out here.

dodge_guy
Explorer
Explorer
We have a 13 Explorer that we tow. It’s 4WD but this generation of Explorer can also be towed if it were only FWD. the Ford Edge of similar years can also be towed.
Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

12 Forest River Georgetown 350TS Hellwig sway bars, BlueOx TrueCenter stabilizer

13 Ford Explorer Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000, VIP Tow>
A bad day camping is
better than a good day at work!

LouLawrence
Explorer
Explorer
Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk. Excellent, light weight and built-in tow option. As mentioned, add a braking system and you are good to go. We use the M&G but there are others.

CA_Traveler
Explorer III
Explorer III
Problems can occur when towing that existed at mfg. An excellecent recent example is death wobble due to EPS which has less damping than hydraulic steering. Do extensive homework on any car because even as a DIY setup is expensive.

Tom is correct as toads represent a very small market for mfg and that market is quickly ignored when other factors are considered.
2009 Holiday Rambler 42' Scepter with ISL 400 Cummins
750 Watts Solar Morningstar MPPT 60 Controller
2014 Grand Cherokee Overland

Bob