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Goodyear Endurance is 5 years too old?

Njmurvin
Explorer
Explorer
My Goodyear Endurance tires just turned 5 years old. Some sources say tires age out at 5 and others say 6. The price of these tires has gone up 50% since I bought them. I’d love to squeeze another year out of them but not if it’s too risky. Thoughts?
2020 Chevy Silverado 3500HD Duramax 4x4 Crew Cab Standard box

2011 Arctic Fox 27.5L
24 REPLIES 24

incampnut
Explorer
Explorer
I wouldn't recommend it, but I put a new set of Firestone HT's on our new fiver in 2006 and didn't change them out until 2018. We had just arrived and got set up when I noticed a nail in one of the tires and took the tire to a shop for repair. When they removed the tire from the wheel, a chunk of the tire broke off along the inside bead. Manager came out and looked at the date on the tire and couldn't believe it. We replaced all four that day! Fiver is stored inside unless in use and tires had minimal wear and still looked good. Not advocating anything here, just sharing my "dumb luck" story. I would like to think I'm a little older and wiser now.
2011 Chevy 2500HD 4X4
2006 Durango 285RLS - Trailair pin box and suspension
Love of my life (wife, not the 5er..but on some days she may argue that) one seventeen year old son.

Cummins12V98
Explorer III
Explorer III
They sell a lot of them as that is why the date codes are so new. Nine were very new in 2017.
2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
37,800# GCVWR "Towing Beast"

"HeavyWeight" B&W RVK3600

2016 MobileSuites 39TKSB3 highly "Elited" In the stable

2007.5 Mobile Suites 36 SB3 29,000# Combined SOLD

Cwilson333
Explorer
Explorer
I bought 4 Endurance 205 75R14 two weeks ago. $642.00 out the door, mounted, balanced, and with new metal HP stems. Date code 7-23 which made them about 2 months or so old. I did not request the date when I ordered them as the tire guy would of probably looked at me like some kind of anal busybody if I had done so, and probably have told me to take a hike..

StirCrazy
Navigator
Navigator
marpel wrote:
StirCrazy,

Not sure if it makes a difference, but my tires are 205/75/14.

Anyway, I have just finished getting quotes from 4 or 5 tire dealers here in the greater Vancouver area, and the most expensive was approximately $1200 (Fountain Tire), while the others were a couple bucks either side of $1000 (OkTire, KalTire etc), with the cheapest, I just ordered from, was a local small auto shop which I have been a customer of for the last ten or so years, at just over $900. All these prices include tax, all fees, and included installation.

Maybe the tire size is the difference, but I'm surprised they are that expensive up there.

Marv


ya that will probably make a huge difference.
2014 F350 6.7 Platinum
2016 Cougar 330RBK
1991 Slumberqueen WS100

Njmurvin
Explorer
Explorer
For reference on SoCal prices, mine are 235/80/16 and the $1212 includes $150 worth of certificates for replacement if the tire is damaged beyond repair for any reason (sidewall punctures, blowouts, etc.). I purchased the same tires from the same dealer almost exactly 5 years ago for $149/ea. They are now $223/ea.
2020 Chevy Silverado 3500HD Duramax 4x4 Crew Cab Standard box

2011 Arctic Fox 27.5L

marpel
Explorer
Explorer
StirCrazy,

Not sure if it makes a difference, but my tires are 205/75/14.

Anyway, I have just finished getting quotes from 4 or 5 tire dealers here in the greater Vancouver area, and the most expensive was approximately $1200 (Fountain Tire), while the others were a couple bucks either side of $1000 (OkTire, KalTire etc), with the cheapest, I just ordered from, was a local small auto shop which I have been a customer of for the last ten or so years, at just over $900. All these prices include tax, all fees, and included installation.

Maybe the tire size is the difference, but I'm surprised they are that expensive up there.

Marv

Njmurvin
Explorer
Explorer
Thanks for the responses. Some answers to your questions...

The trailer lives in SoCal. Weather is very mild. Sun exposure is minimal as trailer is stored parallel to my house with one side within about 4ft of the north side of the house and the other side up against a cement block wall. The awning up high gets some sun exposure but not much down where the tires are. Awning was replaced earlier this year with a model that has the metal shroud.

I only put about 2k miles per year on the trailer. Usage is on the low side. I always inflate the tires to 80lbs before traveling and it has never taken more than a couple of lbs to "top them off".

No visible cracks or bulges.

All that said, I have decided to replace them now instead of waiting another year. It hurts to pay $1200 for the same set of tires I bought for $800 5 years ago. Welcome to inflation. Although even new tires can fail, I won't worry as much about that happening with new shoes.
2020 Chevy Silverado 3500HD Duramax 4x4 Crew Cab Standard box

2011 Arctic Fox 27.5L

Mike134
Explorer
Explorer
I'll give you my advice from my bar stool (is forum advice really any different?)

So, since you'll take advice from a gin mill patron, do you live in Arizona or similar where the tires are baked in the sun? Northern climates where you store and use your trailer? Makes a difference.

Cheers!!
2019 F150 4X4 1903 payload
2018 Adventurer 21RBS 7700 GVWR.

MFL
Nomad II
Nomad II
MarkTwain wrote:
marpel wrote:
I am of the same mind as Mark Twain, to me tires are the most important items on a trailer (and tow vehicle for that matter).

The last set of tires (also Goodyear Endurance) I bought 4 years ago, arrived at the dealer with two year old production date. I was not happy, but the dealer said "take em or leave em". Unfortunately, I was about to leave on a trip so had no choice.

So, they are now 6 years old (even though only 4 years of use) and I am shopping for replacements (at $1000 CDN, for 4 trailer tires...jeeez). Under different circumstance (short trips, easy speeds), I would likely let them go another year or two, but our trips are always long distance (BC, Canada - Denver, Co) on Interstate Highways at 64-65 mph and I won't take a chance getting a high-speed blowout in the middle of nowhere.

As others have suggested, it probably should depend on your anticipated use (short vs long trips etc) and how well you have cared for them, among other things.



Marpel - It is good to know that other people share my opinions of RV tires. I had the same problem with tires not being more than 1 yr. old. I called my tire dealer 6 months before I planned on buying new tires and told them I would not accept any tire more than 1 yr. old. Les Schwab in Calif. They had to search for them but finally got them.:)


I found a deal on new Provider tires, mounted on quality higher rated Vesper wheels online at Gallagher tire in PA. I chatted with sales guy online, asking about date code, and online wheel picture being accurate.

He was ready to go for lunch, and he said "if you give your email, I'll check date code, send pic of code, and pic of exact tire/wheel combo, from warehouse".

About 2 hours later, I received perfect pics in my email. He added that all 4 would be same code, which indicated 10 months old. I emailed my info back, and in a few days UPS delivered them. All was as described, including free shipping.

My experience was great, an honest sales person, a tire dealer I'd recommend.



Jerry

StirCrazy
Navigator
Navigator
marpel wrote:
(at $1000 CDN, for 4 trailer tires...jeeez).


Where are you finding them that cheap? They are just under 400 a tire out here.
2014 F350 6.7 Platinum
2016 Cougar 330RBK
1991 Slumberqueen WS100

MarkTwain
Explorer
Explorer
marpel wrote:
I am of the same mind as Mark Twain, to me tires are the most important items on a trailer (and tow vehicle for that matter).

The last set of tires (also Goodyear Endurance) I bought 4 years ago, arrived at the dealer with two year old production date. I was not happy, but the dealer said "take em or leave em". Unfortunately, I was about to leave on a trip so had no choice.

So, they are now 6 years old (even though only 4 years of use) and I am shopping for replacements (at $1000 CDN, for 4 trailer tires...jeeez). Under different circumstance (short trips, easy speeds), I would likely let them go another year or two, but our trips are always long distance (BC, Canada - Denver, Co) on Interstate Highways at 64-65 mph and I won't take a chance getting a high-speed blowout in the middle of nowhere.

As others have suggested, it probably should depend on your anticipated use (short vs long trips etc) and how well you have cared for them, among other things.



Marpel - It is good to know that other people share my opinions of RV tires. I had the same problem with tires not being more than 1 yr. old. I called my tire dealer 6 months before I planned on buying new tires and told them I would not accept any tire more than 1 yr. old. Les Schwab in Calif. They had to search for them but finally got them.:)

Allworth
Explorer
Explorer
We have gone through a lot of tires in the last 20 years and I switch the rubber on the big (13,000 pounds GVW) trailer between year 5 and year 6. I'm not risking a failure in the middle of nowhere and I'm too old to be changing heavy tires by myself. We did get GoodSam to come all the way to Tombstone AZ from Tucson one time, but three hours in the sun in July waiting for the tire truck made a believer.

I do downrate my take-offs. Either for my son's landscape service trailers or on the local internet with the clear warning that they are cheap but should be considered for local use only!

Good tires are like a good rain suit. Basic to RVing.

A
Formerly posting as "littleblackdog"
Martha, Allen, & Blackjack
2006 Chevy 3500 D/A LB SRW, RVND 7710
Previously: 2008 Titanium 30E35SA. Currently no trailer due to age & mobility problems. Very sad!
"Real Jeeps have round headlights"

marpel
Explorer
Explorer
I am of the same mind as Mark Twain, to me tires are the most important items on a trailer (and tow vehicle for that matter).

The last set of tires (also Goodyear Endurance) I bought 4 years ago, arrived at the dealer with two year old production date. I was not happy, but the dealer said "take em or leave em". Unfortunately, I was about to leave on a trip so had no choice.

So, they are now 6 years old (even though only 4 years of use) and I am shopping for replacements (at $1000 CDN, for 4 trailer tires...jeeez). Under different circumstance (short trips, easy speeds), I would likely let them go another year or two, but our trips are always long distance (BC, Canada - Denver, Co) on Interstate Highways at 64-65 mph and I won't take a chance getting a high-speed blowout in the middle of nowhere.

As others have suggested, it probably should depend on your anticipated use (short vs long trips etc) and how well you have cared for them, among other things.

ScottG
Nomad
Nomad
Cummins12V98 wrote:
ScottG wrote:
Mine are 5 y/o this year as well and I have no intention of replacing them just because of age. I will have to replace them next year because they'll be worn out - at <15K. They'll be replaced with something else that starts out with more tread.


Makes no sense! 15k??? I have a set on my Boat Trailer and they have at least 20-25k and dated 2017. I will run them this Summer and see how the tread looks.

You must have brakes set too tight or some other issue.

Something to consider you have 5 years with no issues on trailer tires that says a lot.


Brakes are self adjusting but I check them each spring anyway - they work perfectly. I do all my own mechanicals and know what I'm doing. I use my exhaust brake so they get a break that way. Tread wear is even but the rears wear slightly faster. Probably a factor of tight turns but nothing different than any of the other trailers I've owned.
I'd like to get alignment checked but there just isn't anyone in the area.
Biggest problem I see is that they don't start with as much rubber as other brands. Most have 50% to 100% more tread.