cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Video Editing Software

j3ff9ack
Explorer
Explorer
Looking for opinions on video editing software. I don't mind buying a good package, but I'm looking at less than $100 - not making the next Avengers movie. I just want to take some old home movies that I had converted to digital and make some modern versions (with all the overexposed pieces deleted). Windows or Mac recommendations are fine - I have both available.
2007 Jayco JayFlight 27.5 RKS
2014 RAM 3500 SRW CC CTD 68RFE
24 REPLIES 24

goodady
Explorer II
Explorer II

Hey! I see it is an old thread but it is suitable for my needs. I am new into video editing and need a easy video editing software that I can use at the beggining. iMovie is too hard for me.

deltabravo
Nomad
Nomad
Im soon going to switch to Davinci Resolve from Adobe Premiere. I'm tired of the monthly subscription model that Adobe places on all their creative software.
2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2018 Arctic Fox 992 with an Onan 2500i "quiet" model generator

JimBollman
Explorer
Explorer
Another vote for iMovie on a Mac. Been using it for many years and it id free. Not real fancy but it is great for simple editing. Glad it worked for the OP and it is free if you have a Mac.

ZenMartian
Explorer
Explorer
I personally use Movavi. It's not as intimidating as other editing software can be, with a pretty intuitive interface, and it didn't bust my budget. I've edited some old family videos on it with pleasing results. Plus, it's got a nice array of titling, transitions, and special effects, which can add a modern touch to digital conversions.

1492
Moderator
Moderator
Bottom-line, you don't have to pay for video editing software. There are editors available for no cost, with no time restrictions or watermarks with their use. And can offer more power and features than paid software. You just need to take the time to learn how to use them, and there tends to be a number of YouTube instructional vids available.



One video editor I recently looked at is the free, open source ShotCut. It's available on multiple platforms, and may be better suited for advance beginners or intermediates with working understanding of timeline editing. It actually has some features not supported on more advanced editors, and can import a wide range of video/audio formats. You can even edit DVD VOB (unencrypted) files directly, which are actually MPEG2, or import FLAC audio which some pro editors won't read natively. It can also edit formats such as Apple ProRes or HEVC MP5 formats. IMO, more powerful than either paid versions of Vegas Movie Studio or Premiere Elements.

It didn't take me long to get up and running using ShotCut, though for more advanced users the workflow is not as efficient as pro editors. Meaning, there were more steps and time required to achieve the same results. An example being adjusting a video clips volume, which requires adding a 'gain/volume' filter and adjusting levels in properties. Or changing the speed of a clip, such as slow motion, by going into its' properties.

Both of which can more easily be achieved in pro editors such as Davinci Resolve by using keyboard shortcuts, or doing so directly in the timeline.

One handy feature is that ShotCut is able to do a final export using the GPU, similar to Handbrake options, as long as you have a sufficiently equipped system. This software won't replace my pro editors, though will resort to using it specifically for legacy formats such as old DVD files or otherwise unsupported formats in my preferred editor.

My recommendations is still Davinci Resolve as it basically combines Premiere Pro, After Effects, and Audition into one editor for free, with no time or render limitations. Though admittedly, as an advanced editor, tends to be intimidating and has a higher learning curve for new users. My work pays for full Adobe CC license, though still prefer Davinci Resolve. I'd advice to skip the 4,000 page manual, and just watch the many videos available online.

Aside, recently back from NAB 2023 where Dolby showed me how to edit/mix their Dolby Vision and Atmos tracks in Davinci Resolve. You can even encode and playback to Dolby Atmos home systems. Though not to movie theater cinema processors (Dolby CP850), as this requires it to be packaged only by licensed Dolby facilities.

1492
Moderator
Moderator
By coincidence, I followed the same path. Started with Vegas from Sonic Foundry. It was originally designed for multi-track audio mastering/editor until users discovered that it also did video.

I started using Vegas Pro exclusively when Sony acquired the software, and took seminars at film festivals and NAB given by Sony development team. I felt Vegas had the most user friendly workflow, and thought of it as the closest WIN version of Apple's Final Cut Pro.

Transitioned to Adobe Premiere Pro as that's whats approved (and paid) for at work. Premiere Pro CC as become a very powerful editor capable of handling most any project.

Started using Davinci Resolve FREE mostly out of curiosity. Then received multiple copies of Resolve Studio included when I bought cameras/hardware from BlackMagic Designs. Now basically hooked on Resolve, and have it installed on both PC/Mac.

Now in the process of getting software waiver approved at work to install Resolve on my office iMac. A requirement for network security purposes, as unapproved software can be detected/removed remotely by our SOC. Don't ask me how I know, even though I have IT admin privileges. :h

SageCrispin
Explorer
Explorer
I guess the decision has been made by the OP, but I'll chime in anyway, mostly in defense of Resolve.

For TL;DR people:
I agree that Davinci Resolve is the editor of choice for higher end capabilities. The free version has massive power, and the one time paid version is far below the price of the Adobe Premiere subscription.

More to say:
On the other hand, I started with Vegas when it was originally built by Sonic Foundry, followed it to Sony and now on to Magix. I love Vegas (consumer and pro) and always recommend it to any seeking a lower cost editor. It seems far more intuitive than any of the others including the free open source offerings.

For many years I used HitFilm (free and pro) and found it worked well, but the lack of documentation finally drove me to Resolve. I still think HitFilm (especially the free version) is a viable alternative for basic editors. Just skip all the special effects talk. Similar to Resolve, you don't have to use all the power. They both work just fine for the basics. You don't have to learn all there is to know just to create relatively simple vids.

On the very basic front, iMovie and Windows Photo are the built in creators. (Before you all jump on me-NO, Windows Movie Maker is no longer supported/available. It has been depreciated in favor of Windows Photo. See HERE) These both work, but most will outgrow them very quickly if you do more than one or two videos a year.

FWIW, Sage
We've run out in the house, but the RV has two.

Damon Challenger.
Jeep Unlimited toad

1492
Moderator
Moderator
The Olive editor looks like it's following a path similar to Davinci, though still basically Alpha stage in development. Whereas, Resolve is a refined, stable software that actively supported.

What blows my mind is that Davinci cost $250,000.+ just over a decade ago. Used in movies/tv including Avengers: Infinity War, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Avatar, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Big Bang Theory, The Walking Dead, others.

Then they added Fusion, a compositor similar to After Effects, which had been used in The Hunger Game, Kingsman: The Secret Service, many more.

And Fairlight, a digital audio workstation designed for Hollywood movies/network tv shows.

And you get all this capability for FREE? Other paid video editors mentioned are not really in the same class, and have nowhere near the power. Resolve is quickly becoming my favorite editor.

If you're comfortable with using other timeline video editors, Resolve is not that difficult to learn.

Tom_M1
Explorer
Explorer
An excellent source for anything video is VideoHelp.com

Check the "Software" section.

Olive Video Editor sounds interesting.

https://www.olivevideoeditor.org/download.php
Tom
2005 Born Free 24RB
170ah Renogy LiFePo4 drop-in battery 400 watts solar
Towing 2016 Mini Cooper convertible on tow dolly
Minneapolis, MN

1492
Moderator
Moderator
Both the paid versions of Vegas Movie Studio and Premiere Elements have color correction tools, though they do not provide video scopes. You need to buy the Pro versions to get them. But even the FREE version of Davinci Resolve provide 1, 2, or 4 scopes displayed at the same time.

Decades ago when I worked as an ENG/EFP camera operator, I always used portable waveform/vector-scope combo (top two below). We were under tight schedules with clients, and there wasn't enough time or budget to hire a colorist in a post house. Especially, when we could have spotted issues when shooting the footage. Broadcast cameras in those days had few built in tools to help judge video signals.

Bottom line, your eyes cannot always tell what's accurately going on with a color signal. That's where scopes are so useful. You don't have to have an extensive knowledge on how to use them. You can focus on how they can help to correct skin tones for instance. Footage where faces may be a little green or blue due to camera white balance issues. There are several 20-30 min. YouTube videos to get started, which may be all that's needed.


1492
Moderator
Moderator
Was removing missed spam post from this thread, and thought I'd chime in.

I have both Vegas Pro/Movie Studio, still one of my favorite editors though haven't used them in quite some time. The issue is Magix Software's frustrating upgrade process, preventing my ability to do so though have multiple licenses requiring contacting them to resolve. Not an issue if you install the full-version.

I now use Adobe Premiere Elements on my travel laptop which allows install on 2 separate PC and/or Mac computers. Similar to licensing of Adobe Premiere Pro CC which I use at work. You can easily install on a new computer, just by de-activating one you are not using.

I've discovered that Premiere Elements (PE) has many powerful features built-in that can emulate pro level editors. Though more archaic to use, its interface not as clearly layed out nor easily accomplished as in Premiere Pro CC. Particularly useful is that the latest PE versions support editing variable frame rate video, what most smartphones record. Whereas, Vegas Movie Studio would often stutter playback.

My gripes with PE is few keyboard shortcuts available, and only CPU based rendering HD MP4 videos which can slow down the process to 1-2x real-time at best. Whereas, my workstation at work can GPU render Premiere Pro CC HD files at up to 10x real-time using a fast NVIDIA graphics card.

I'll also mention another FREE powerful though arguably the most complicated video editor of the group, available for both PC/Mac, Davinci Resolve. It has literally been used for movies, television, and commercials with a world class color corrector. If you've ever bought a camera/hardware device from Blackmagic Designs, it likely included the full Studio version of Resolve which has more pro-level features enabled. I use both the Studio/Free versions, primarily if I don't have access to Premiere Pro CC.

The biggest downside of Resolve is that it has a high learning curve as it works differently than how most other video editors work. However, there are tons of free instructional videos on YouTube, and if you take the time to learn it, you'll discover how powerful it is.

j3ff9ack
Explorer
Explorer
OP here - since I had iMovie on the Mac, I gave that a try this weekend. I think it will do what I need without spending any more $$. Thanks for the help and travel safe.
2007 Jayco JayFlight 27.5 RKS
2014 RAM 3500 SRW CC CTD 68RFE

Gdetrailer
Explorer III
Explorer III
Tom_M wrote:
Gdetrailer wrote:
Sony "VEGAS".

The trick to VEGAS is to buy an OLDER VERSION while it is still available.

You can get Vegas Movie Studio 12 for $40 on Amazon..
You can buy the latest version for not much more.
VEGAS Movie Studio $49.99 on Amazon

You can download a free trial here:
https://www.vegascreativesoftware.com/us/vegas-movie-studio/


Tom, yours is not "Platinum" version, it is a BASIC BAREBONES version which IS why it is cheap.

You can buy an OLDER PLATINUM version for less and get MORE features than the NEWER BASIC VERSIONS.

Sony Vegas has a pretty confusing array of versions and levels, the newer versions and levels can easily reach $500 level if you like.

For the most part, unlike the general consensus of this forum, you do not "need" to buy the newest, latest version just to edit video or audio..

Version 11 of Platinum level included HD video so going forward ANY version higher than 11 will be able to deal with pretty much any video out there.

AsheGuy
Explorer
Explorer
I've been using AVS on Windows for years. It has free version and inexpensive paid version.
David & Margaret - 2005 LTV 210B 3S
- Our Blog -