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Running Dedicated Water Line For RV at Home?

longislandcampe
Explorer
Explorer
So when we are camping we always use a splitter on the water spigot at the campground. One line runs to the camper water intake and the other goes to the sewer flush. We only connect the sewer flush to the camper once we actually need it.

So no that we decided to store the camper at our house we are looking for ways to basically have a full hookup site at our house.

We only have one outdoor water spigot and it’s in our backyard about 75’ from the camper. I’d love to have something a little closer and was wondering if I could put a splitter on my backyard spigot. One line would be for general yard stuff and the other would go towards the camper. I was thinking of using and burying pex for the 75’ run to the camper and then having it end on a post with dual spigots or a single spigot with a basic splitter again.

Now if I did this, could I simply leave the original spigot turned on all the time so that I’d have water at the camper whenever I needed it? I mean, it’s not the end of the world to walk 75’ to turn the water on but if I could have it right at the camper that would be awesome.

Also, if I can keep that 75’ line pressurized all the time then should I worry about the actual water quality? The water would be running a few times a year from April through October and we don’t drink it.
16 REPLIES 16

Thermoguy
Explorer II
Explorer II
I ran a sprinkler system in my barn using 3/4" flex tubing, designed for sprinklers. I did some research before I started and Pex is not supposed to be exposed to sunlight or installed outdoors. It is for in walls. I do not recall if it can be buried, but when I compared pricing, flexible sprinkler tubing was cheaper than Pex. I ran about 300' of line with 5 sprinkler heads and it is working great, easy to drain. But, for this application, the frost free hydrant type is the perfect solution. Bury the pipe below the frost line and add a hydrant at the end, use it forever. I have 3 of those around my property including one where we park the RV. Never an issue for getting water to fill before a trip or if a friend is staying for a few days.

RLS7201
Explorer
Explorer
Or you could run the water line above ground and put a LOW POINT DRAIN on it.

Richard
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C_Schomer
Explorer
Explorer
I have pex, direct burial, from the meter to my house and it’s never been a problem. I went into my basement and drilled through the foundation about 20 inches below ground and ran electrical and pex out to my pole barn. The electrical and pex are both in larger PVC pipes for protection. I never planned on using water year-round so I put stop and drain valves in the basement and I winterize it. I put in an RV dump, to one of the side ports on my septic tank, but I have never used it… I always dump before I get home, at the park dumps. Craig.
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longislandcampe
Explorer
Explorer
I’m really not concerned about it freezing because I wouldn’t be using the water line in the winter. How bout the following setup.

Have a splitter on my outdoor spigot. One side for regular garden hose and one side for the camper. The camper side is hooked up using a short run of pex which then connects to copper tubing running underground for about 75’ to another spigot for the camper.

This would solve the buried pex problem with it getting chewed up. I already have the fittings to attach to the camper water inlet to blow out the lines with my compressor. Couldn’t I simply unscrew the regular garden hose side, attach my compressor to that side, open all the water valves and blow the line out in the fall? I just need a new fitting to attach to that side.

This side of the house is north facing so it gets no sun. If I have to replace a few feet of pex every so often then that’s no biggie.

What do you think?

Bobbo
Explorer II
Explorer II
wapiticountry wrote:
Pex is not rated for burial.

You may want to tell that to the professional plumbers who replaced my ruptured home main water line with a 1 inch PEX line, and the city code inspectors who signed off on it without a qualm.

The problem is not burying the PEX. The problem is that if water freezes inside the PEX, the PEX can burst. You have to bury PEX below the frost line, or drain it.
Bobbo and Lin
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wapiticountry
Explorer
Explorer
Pex is not rated for burial. If you don’t want to dig up your yard check with an irrigation company to have them use a vibrating plow to run a line. Or, if you are really handy, vibrating plows can be rented. They aren’t that hard to use but the errors in trial and error could make a mess of a nice lawn. If you go that direction be sure your utilities are located and marked. Cutting a gas, electric or other utility line really ruins a day.

LouLawrence
Explorer
Explorer
If it's only a couple times per year, is it really worth the effort? A hose run from a splitter a couple of time per year still sounds like the best and easiest solution.

Cummins12V98
Explorer III
Explorer III
Frost free

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valhalla360
Traveler
Traveler
Pex should be fine, just remember to winterize and mark where the line runs. Alternatively, if you place it deep enough and use a frost valve, you don't need to winterize.

I wouldn't put a garden hose splitter on the tap but add a "T" before the tap. You might put a separate valve just downstream of the "T" so you can depressurize the line if you need to work on it. During installation, the cost would be negligible.
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schlep1967
Explorer III
Explorer III
What wa8yxm said. Tap into a cold water line closest to the the end of the house the camper is on. You mentioned PEX so assuming you have the tools, buy a self draining hose bib for the install at that end of the house. Unless that end is an unheated garage, then go with running it out underground and a frost proof hydrant. Your original plan of running PEX 75 feet, PEX is not UV protected. You do not want to expose it to sunlight or it will not last very long.
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JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
I didn't look but freezing can be issue in most of the country.
Now I'm not a plumber, but have installed a few frost-proof hydrants, and replaced some where people did not use them right.
If I'm reading the OP right, this is a near-perfect case of attempted murder of the hydrant.
The hydrant is designed to be set with the stem in a bed of gravel below frost line. The actual valve is down at bottom of stem. When you shut the water off, the valve stops flow from pipe and opens the upright so it can drain. A hose, or the add-on line is likely to keep the stem of hydrant full of water. Freeze swell and bust.
You say you plan to bury line hydrant to camper, so much of the digging is in the plan. Why not do it right, tee off the line at base of hydrant, and install a 2nd hydrant near the camper? Then if you disconnect the hose when temps drop, all issues will be in camper.

wa8yxm
Explorer II
Explorer II
Consider running a line from inside the house. Be sure to bury it deep enough if you get low temps (most of the USA does) to prevent freezing.. and either put a frostproof hydrant at the RV end or clear the line in the winter time (Drain back valve inside and blow it out) I like the frostproof option best.
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craig7h
Traveler
Traveler
Not being a plumber, but to me your plan sounds like it would work just fine. So it gets really cold in Long island NY if you still live there right. If so you will need some way to drain the water out of your water line, unless you buried it below the frost line.
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Community Alumni
Not applicable
This may be dumb but, would the PEX be chewed by gophers or a mole?

JimR

navigator2346
Explorer
Explorer
i don't see a problem