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1/2 ton cement mixer.......

blt2ski
Moderator
Moderator


I'll leave at this.

Only real issue towing is was the 5000 or so lbs of moving mass on trailer. Otherwise at 7-8000 lbs total it was not a big deal...

My son took a picture jack knifed in back of my daughter, his younger sisters yard....I'll if I can get it.

Sons picture


Marty
92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer
24 REPLIES 24

blt2ski
Moderator
Moderator
As noted. Buying x number of bags, renting a small electric mixer, would've cost just as much, taken longer, than getting it pre-mixed in this mixer, or a non moving metal box trailer then pouring either out.
Issue with the metal trailer, is stuff can settle as you drive down the road. This it does not.
This place also had a few single axle lcf trucks with will swag a 4 maybe 5 yd drum on them for local too. not sure if it is a tent and drive truck, probably not as they had a mid 30k gvw sticker, air brakes etc. They are very well st up for what I would call local under 20-25 miles away deliveries.
Both my son and I have used the non barrel trailers. This was a much nicer way to pour etc the concrete. We both admit, it would have been nicer if a 3-4' chute or two could have been attached.

Marty
92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer

dodge_guy
Explorer II
Explorer II
JRscooby wrote:
time2roll wrote:
JRscooby wrote:
IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.
Not to mention the renter will add the wrong amount of water and blame the company for the bad concrete.


The few loads I drove a mixer, it was impressed on me the job supervisor had to mark the ticket every time water was added

Grit dog wrote:
JRscooby wrote:
dodge guy wrote:
So are we to expect to run back and forth to the cement place to get a load? That would barely be enough for 10X10 pad! Seems to me this is for mixing bagged concrete on site. I rented a smaller one to do my Hit Tub pad. Worked perfect. And I used my 01 Explorer.


I fail to stand under this question. This trailer looks like a good way to avoid short load charges. IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.


If you have more than a cy or 2 to place, you get a mixer truck, or yes run back n forth. I'm sure you could rent it as a big mortar mixer, but I bet the concrete supplier want's the same $ full of concrete or empty.

The hypothetical dry batch scenario is not a reasonable solution as the drum would need to be dried out 100% between each load.
When I have to have concrete dry batched, it's about double the charge as it takes a truck out of service way longer per load plus the effort to dry it out.
My last dry batch scenario, just looked it up today as I am pricing another project that requires it. In 2018, 1 way haul of just over an hour, dry batch, 3 trucks on 2 different days, 6 total, was about $16,000. This was for about 25cy of concrete and about $5k or that was the mix design and additional admixtures (for a 2 day 6000psi mix). Or over $400/cy for just the concrete, vs approx $100/cy currently in that area for 4000psi air entrained structural concrete.


The plants I hauled into would load a mixer with rock, spin for a few minutes, then run the rock back into stockpile. Put sand in first, because sand will likely be wet, then dry rock. Cement would go in last.
I could see how a company the did a lot of small jobs might come out owning something like that to self haul, avoid the extra cost of short loads delivered.
There is/was a company in the area that had bins, tank and mixer mounted on a truck. I talked to the driver, said it was hard to keep customers happy. Everybody wanted their little dab at the same time.


My point is, this seems like a poor solution to a non problem. If you need anything more than that mixer, get a truck. If not get a small mixer and mix on site. That mixer just seems like over or under Jill for any project!
Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

12 Forest River Georgetown 350TS Hellwig sway bars, BlueOx TrueCenter stabilizer

13 Ford Explorer Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000, VIP Tow>
A bad day camping is
better than a good day at work!

JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
time2roll wrote:
JRscooby wrote:
IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.
Not to mention the renter will add the wrong amount of water and blame the company for the bad concrete.


The few loads I drove a mixer, it was impressed on me the job supervisor had to mark the ticket every time water was added

Grit dog wrote:
JRscooby wrote:
dodge guy wrote:
So are we to expect to run back and forth to the cement place to get a load? That would barely be enough for 10X10 pad! Seems to me this is for mixing bagged concrete on site. I rented a smaller one to do my Hit Tub pad. Worked perfect. And I used my 01 Explorer.


I fail to stand under this question. This trailer looks like a good way to avoid short load charges. IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.


If you have more than a cy or 2 to place, you get a mixer truck, or yes run back n forth. I'm sure you could rent it as a big mortar mixer, but I bet the concrete supplier want's the same $ full of concrete or empty.

The hypothetical dry batch scenario is not a reasonable solution as the drum would need to be dried out 100% between each load.
When I have to have concrete dry batched, it's about double the charge as it takes a truck out of service way longer per load plus the effort to dry it out.
My last dry batch scenario, just looked it up today as I am pricing another project that requires it. In 2018, 1 way haul of just over an hour, dry batch, 3 trucks on 2 different days, 6 total, was about $16,000. This was for about 25cy of concrete and about $5k or that was the mix design and additional admixtures (for a 2 day 6000psi mix). Or over $400/cy for just the concrete, vs approx $100/cy currently in that area for 4000psi air entrained structural concrete.


The plants I hauled into would load a mixer with rock, spin for a few minutes, then run the rock back into stockpile. Put sand in first, because sand will likely be wet, then dry rock. Cement would go in last.
I could see how a company the did a lot of small jobs might come out owning something like that to self haul, avoid the extra cost of short loads delivered.
There is/was a company in the area that had bins, tank and mixer mounted on a truck. I talked to the driver, said it was hard to keep customers happy. Everybody wanted their little dab at the same time.

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
JRscooby wrote:
dodge guy wrote:
So are we to expect to run back and forth to the cement place to get a load? That would barely be enough for 10X10 pad! Seems to me this is for mixing bagged concrete on site. I rented a smaller one to do my Hit Tub pad. Worked perfect. And I used my 01 Explorer.


I fail to stand under this question. This trailer looks like a good way to avoid short load charges. IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.


If you have more than a cy or 2 to place, you get a mixer truck, or yes run back n forth. I'm sure you could rent it as a big mortar mixer, but I bet the concrete supplier want's the same $ full of concrete or empty.

The hypothetical dry batch scenario is not a reasonable solution as the drum would need to be dried out 100% between each load.
When I have to have concrete dry batched, it's about double the charge as it takes a truck out of service way longer per load plus the effort to dry it out.
My last dry batch scenario, just looked it up today as I am pricing another project that requires it. In 2018, 1 way haul of just over an hour, dry batch, 3 trucks on 2 different days, 6 total, was about $16,000. This was for about 25cy of concrete and about $5k or that was the mix design and additional admixtures (for a 2 day 6000psi mix). Or over $400/cy for just the concrete, vs approx $100/cy currently in that area for 4000psi air entrained structural concrete.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

1320Fastback
Explorer
Explorer
They are inteded to be loaded at the rental company. They have a conveyer that they load the sand, rock and mix onto and it loads it into the trailer all at once and they also inject the water at that time too. If I remember right the place I've gone too gives you 90 min to get back before a day charge is applied although I've not come close to running out of time.

Here's one I used to fill in old aviary bays before framing walls and a roof to extend the building. https://imgur.com/gallery/1vjyPiN
1992 D250 Cummins 5psd
2005 Forest River T26 Toy Hauler

time2roll
Nomad
Nomad
JRscooby wrote:
IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.
Not to mention the renter will add the wrong amount of water and blame the company for the bad concrete.

JRscooby
Explorer II
Explorer II
dodge guy wrote:
So are we to expect to run back and forth to the cement place to get a load? That would barely be enough for 10X10 pad! Seems to me this is for mixing bagged concrete on site. I rented a smaller one to do my Hit Tub pad. Worked perfect. And I used my 01 Explorer.


I fail to stand under this question. This trailer looks like a good way to avoid short load charges. IMHO it would be even better if you could pick up the sand, rock, and cement loaded in the hopper, add water and mix when get to site. Not likely to happen, because once the water is in the owner knows the renter will hurry to unload it.

Groover
Explorer II
Explorer II
"I'm surprised at pulling power of this 4.3 V6 tho." "I'm surprised at pulling power of this 4.3 V6 tho."

My son recently bought an F150 extended cab with the 6.5ft bed and the 3.3 engine to use around his small farm. Most trips are under 50 miles and it is suiting his needs very well. Two small kids fit well in the back seat, lots of cargo room in the 6.5ft bed and the capability to pull a medium size trailer to handle what won't fit in the bed. It was cheap to buy, gives great fuel economy, has good power if you let it wind up some and is relatively simple. He is investing the money that he saved so that if he needs a big truck sometime down the road he will be able to afford it.

dodge_guy
Explorer II
Explorer II
So are we to expect to run back and forth to the cement place to get a load? That would barely be enough for 10X10 pad! Seems to me this is for mixing bagged concrete on site. I rented a smaller one to do my Hit Tub pad. Worked perfect. And I used my 01 Explorer.
Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

12 Forest River Georgetown 350TS Hellwig sway bars, BlueOx TrueCenter stabilizer

13 Ford Explorer Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000, VIP Tow>
A bad day camping is
better than a good day at work!

blt2ski
Moderator
Moderator
mkirsch wrote:
The ready mix trailer has a fraction of the wind resistance that an 8000lb travel trailer would. You also aren't hauling that loaded ready mix trailer on a long trip so you are much more tolerant of any performance/handling issues. You'll tell yourself, "It's not so bad," because you're not hauling it on a long trip, but if you had to run 300 miles with it, it might start grating on you.


True.
On the other hand, I would probably not want to to this trailer for 300 miles, as by then the concrete would be curing. The spinning of the drum and how the weight shifting would be more if a factor too.
But, if I'm going from about 60 sq ft of frontal area now, to 90 sq ft like my TT was. That's an additional 30 hp or so needed at 60 mph. Same hp needed if I added only 10,000 lbs of actual weight! Either of those adds behind current set up, be it a 15, 25, or 35 sw/dw setup is going to be noticable.
Still, to be able to pull a 2-3% freeway grade at 55-60 mph is doi g pretty good at what I will guesstimate us 14,000 lbs gcw. I weighed truck at a dump yesterday as empty as I have been able to over the last month at 5640 with me in it. I was 6100 truck, 5860 in axle if equipment trailer last week. Had no problem doing 60 on the same 2-3% grades. I had my mini excavator behind me.
Only issue I truly had, was I spun rear tires goi g up a freeway on ramp, got the anti-skid system squeaking at me. Not sure if the reason(s) were GY SR-A tires not liking wet rained in roads. Lack of hitch weight and heavy trailer behind me. Or some combo there of. I have had this issue before with other trucks and trailers combos. Usually ice/snow and steeper grades.
So would towing an 8000 lb rv trailer be more or less fun? As I noted earlier, I would be going slower due to wind resistance, mpgs would be less due to wind resistance. Whether or not I would be more tired cranky or otherwise.....hard to say.i could very well be going faster with this truck than I did with my 96 SW K3500 crew cab with a turbo diesel. Then again, this truck has an additional 100hp available, 100 lb ft of less torque, one more trans gear, auto vs manual..... Some places better, some worst in reality.
So far, it's doing things as well or better than I expected.

Marty
92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer

mkirsch
Nomad II
Nomad II
The ready mix trailer has a fraction of the wind resistance that an 8000lb travel trailer would. You also aren't hauling that loaded ready mix trailer on a long trip so you are much more tolerant of any performance/handling issues. You'll tell yourself, "It's not so bad," because you're not hauling it on a long trip, but if you had to run 300 miles with it, it might start grating on you.

Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
A cy of typical structural concrete is about 145lb/cf or 3800-3900lb/cy.
Generally estimate average reinforced concrete at 150 lb/cf.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

mooky_stinks
Explorer
Explorer
jdc1 wrote:
A pallet of dry concrete is a yard. It weighs 3,000 pounds. about 40 gallons of water are needed. 40 X 8.33 = 1,320 pounds. That's about 5,300 pounds there (1-1/4 yards) plus the weight of the mixer. Now we know why it has two 3,500-5,000 pound axles.


I think you meant to say 40 gallons of water is 320;)
2020 F150 XL Screw 4x4 6.5”box
3.5 ecoboost Max tow HDPP
7850 GVW. 4800 RAWR
2565 payload

2020 Cougar 29RKS 5th wheel

jdc1
Explorer II
Explorer II
A pallet of dry concrete is a yard. It weighs 3,000 pounds. about 40 gallons of water are needed. 40 X 8.33 = 1,320 pounds. That's about 5,300 pounds there (1-1/4 yards) plus the weight of the mixer. Now we know why it has two 3,500-5,000 pound axles.