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F250 upgrades

RKW
Explorer
Explorer
I have a 2015 F250. It's has a 6.5 bed, and it's a diesel. Both of those facts mean that the cargo carrying capacity is diminished compared to a long bed gasser. I haul a 5th wheel and it noticeably squats the the truck. After reading THIS article, I'm considering changing the suspension block out for a F350 suspension block, and adding air bags. This being the internet its not likely anyone has an opinion on this, but just in case, thoughts anyone?
Ryan

  • 2015 Ford F250


  • 2015 Rockwood Signature Ultralite 8280 WS


  • Dual Honda EU2000i Generators




    The wages of sin are death; but after they're done taking out taxes, it's just a tired feeling.
29 REPLIES 29

nickthehunter
Nomad II
Nomad II
PA12DRVR wrote:
… Wonder how many of the folks asserting those opinions have been involved in a fatality or serious injury case where there was a colorable argument that the vehicle at fault was over GVWR? Not asking about tickets, warnings, pulling off the road for being unsafe: asking about a fatal or serious crash where GVWR may have been in play.
Never, as in never been an issue.

MFL
Nomad II
Nomad II
Grit dog wrote:
^Well assuming you got the camper package or something on yours.
OP is complaining about too much squat. So regardless he’s looking to shore that up…I think.

The regular old F250 company trucks I had, a 2012 and then a 2015 had a compliant initial spring rate. They’d stiffen up pretty good with real weight on them, but that first couple inches of suspension travel was built for comfort.


Yup, camper package was available, but I chose the heavy duty service suspension package.

For the sticker readers...nothing changes with either package. The GVWR stays at 10,000, payload is GVWR, minus the curb wt, and RAWR remains at 6,200, even though I have similar capability as F350.

For softer ride, when wanted, I lower the tire pressure, mostly on the rear, although front coils are HD as well.

Jerry

Cummins12V98
Explorer III
Explorer III
My 2011 RAM has 4,500# pin weight in pic #1. Rides nice and "LEVEL". I added bags and Bilstien's for ride QUALITY!!! I ran 30psi LOADED in second pic. Notice it sets about the same??? This is what I wanted as the bags were only to control the suspension on the ROUGH California Highways.

It rode on the overloads as it should for a nice ride. Some may call this "Squat" and want to raise it to unloaded ride level. NO WAY!!!



2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
37,800# GCVWR "Towing Beast"

"HeavyWeight" B&W RVK3600

2016 MobileSuites 39TKSB3 highly "Elited" In the stable

2007.5 Mobile Suites 36 SB3 29,000# Combined SOLD

dodge_guy
Explorer
Explorer
I would add airbags, as they are easily adjustable for differing weights.

With that said. If you added a truck there are 2 different ratios you can order. Those being the only 2 differences can net you an increase for in towing ability by 5k lbs. sometimes more, sometimes less.
Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

12 Forest River Georgetown 350TS Hellwig sway bars, BlueOx TrueCenter stabilizer

13 Ford Explorer Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000, VIP Tow>
A bad day camping is
better than a good day at work!

RKW
Explorer
Explorer
Thanks to all who contributed.
Ryan

  • 2015 Ford F250


  • 2015 Rockwood Signature Ultralite 8280 WS


  • Dual Honda EU2000i Generators




    The wages of sin are death; but after they're done taking out taxes, it's just a tired feeling.

Retired_JSO
Explorer
Explorer
All our trucks squat a bit. As you apply weight on the hitch, the truck compresses the comfy area of the springs and as you add more weight, you reach the load carrying of the springs. The next time you hookup, check the fender well openings on the truck front to rear. 2” down on the rear would be common on your F250 with your Rockwood.

PA12DRVR
Explorer
Explorer
Again, interesting to see the strongly held opinions on the GVWR issue. Wonder how many of the folks asserting those opinions have been involved in a fatality or serious injury case where there was a colorable argument that the vehicle at fault was over GVWR? Not asking about tickets, warnings, pulling off the road for being unsafe: asking about a fatal or serious crash where GVWR may have been in play.
CRL
My RV is a 1946 PA-12
Back in the GWN

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
Groover wrote:
I am going to through in a totally different consideration if you decide to add airbags.

You can choose between having both bags on the same air line or separate air lines. Separate air lines add stability for high center of gravity loads like some 5th wheels. They can also facilitate hitching up to a 5th wheel on uneven ground by twisting the truck to match the alignment of the camper. On the other hand, when riding empty or with a low CG load a single line allows for more articulation of the rear axle which gives a smoother ride helps avoid getting stuck on uneven ground.


Correct, although generally no air is needed where articulation would be needed.
Never really a better reason to plumb both bags together although there are some scenarios where it is not worse.
OP is in a diffenrt frame of thought though. Not this level of detail.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

Groover
Explorer II
Explorer II
I am going to through in a totally different consideration if you decide to add airbags.

You can choose between having both bags on the same air line or separate air lines. Separate air lines add stability for high center of gravity loads like some 5th wheels. They can also facilitate hitching up to a 5th wheel on uneven ground by twisting the truck to match the alignment of the camper. On the other hand, when riding empty or with a low CG load a single line allows for more articulation of the rear axle which gives a smoother ride helps avoid getting stuck on uneven ground.

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
^Well assuming you got the camper package or something on yours.
OP is complaining about too much squat. So regardless he’s looking to shore that up…I think.

The regular old F250 company trucks I had, a 2012 and then a 2015 had a compliant initial spring rate. They’d stiffen up pretty good with real weight on them, but that first couple inches of suspension travel was built for comfort.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

MFL
Nomad II
Nomad II
Grit dog wrote:
MFL wrote:
Didn't read the article, but agree with above, no reason to change out the block. Air bags would easily level the truck.

The LT WT fiver in signature, should not cause much squat to a 250. It would be considered 1/2 ton towable to many.

Your 250 rear axle, which will carry most all of the pin wt, should be good for 6,000-6200 lbs. The diesel up front will not change RAWR. The truck tires will have at least 6,400 wt rating.

Jerry


Those years are SOFT. Final spring rate is normal but they ride nice empty and are squishy in the first bit of travel.

And those axles are good for close to 10k not 6k.

Regardless, OP, this is less about the truck and more about being gullible. Learn to recognize click bait. And also learn just a smidge about your truck and things like leverage. Because your theory why your truck is “squatting” is also flawed.


You are correct, the axle is good for at least 10K. I should have said the RAWR is at least 6K+, due to the springs, and maybe tires. However, in those mid teen years, several spring options were available, so not all are soft. My 250 supports an extra 2K over the rear axle, with minimal squat.



These are my F250 springs, with only a B&W FW hitch for load.
Do these springs look soft and squishy to you? Let me tell you, they will carry any FW on the lot!!!:C

Jerry

MFL
Nomad II
Nomad II
Often times, it is the same person that keeps spouting the civil suit nonsense, concerning GVWR/payload. I think he is just trying to justify buying a DRW truck that he didn't need.

There are many things that are much easier to bring a civil suit for, than an RVer being over a number, that is not a legal requirement. The biggest reason for a civil suit, is a vulnerable individual, with deep pockets, that is an inviting target to dead beats, trying to legally steal from honest folks.

The average American owes more than they are worth, so no target there.

Jerry

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
Well you guys can post all the correct information you want but in my experience on this forum, you will not convince a good number of people that they don’t need to be afraid of their own shadows when it comes to supposed “liability.” Just like you’ll never convince many of the same people that in general 3/4 tons are basically under-rated 1 tons with only lighter duty springs.
Canadian traffic law revenue generation aside…of course.
Good luck.
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

blt2ski
Moderator
Moderator
EVERY CVEO I've run into has stated, manufactures weight ratings are a warranty rating only. I get up to 20k lbs per axle, assuming I have enought tire width, ie 40" per axle. Or 34000 per tandem, or two axles close together ie less than X feet. 37000 if if between x and y fett. Over y feet I get the 20,000 per. 25k in a few cases.
ALL one needs is proper paid for licence. Being over an axle limit will net you a fine, a CVEO can make you move the load around so you are legal if doable. Assuming fined, a non moving violation like a parking ticket.
With this said. IF your an unsafe rig, the CVEO can get you off the road, and it will HURT you pocket book! Go against your driving record,bpsy more in insurance etc.
One person a number of years back got sued by dead persons family. Ended up getting attorneys fees, time off work etc paid by dead persons family. Yes person died getting t-boned at 150% of gcwr. BUT dead person pulled out in front of pickup trailer. Dead persons fault he did so.
Another truck driver on here wrote about having company CC when going into Louisiana. He could only weigh 80k lbs. Yet in the three states to west he came from, legal was 120k lbs. Gets to border, pays $350 fine, drives 25 miles farther, unloads rig, drives back, starts ALL over next week.
Weight laws are there to protect the road bed engineer design limit. NOT the manufacture design limit of the vehicle.
Civil cases things go out the door. Your insurance company may settle out of court, even if your not guilty. If the can settle for $100,000, vs $300,000 in attorney fees to prove your innocent. Guess what, their paying the $100k.

Here in Wa st, I pay tonnage in 2000 lb increments. We have to license at 150% of tare, to next highest ton. Montana is 7500 or 15000 for pickups. If you license your 3500 at 7500, get pulled over at 14000, you get a 6500 lb over weight ticket. I got pulled over at 27000 with a paid for gvw of 26000. Door sticker is 18200. Got a 10 day to up paid for gvw to 28000. For those of us that truly know weight laws. Manufactures ratings mean squat per federal bridge laws. "bridge" in that law, means spreading the load across the road, so the point load is not going to destroy the road bed, be it on solid ground, or a literal bridge, ferry deck etc that is paid for via city, county, state or federal funds.

Maryy
92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer