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Propane Powered Engines Featuring a 7.3 Ford and 6.7 Cummins

FishOnOne
Explorer III
Explorer III
Propane equipment supplier to add propane to your gas engine. A couple of interesting points: This supplier claims engine factory performance is still maintained. That 6.7 cummins has a turbo which means that the gas powered version will also have a turbo. This has to be the first Cummins engine with spark plugs.

Sorry forgot to include link.

Link
'12 Ford Super Duty FX4 ELD CC 6.7 PSD 400HP 800ft/lbs "270k Miles"
'16 Sprinter 319MKS "Wide Body"
23 REPLIES 23

FishOnOne
Explorer III
Explorer III
Turtle n Peeps wrote:
Propane:

The good:
#1. Clean burning fuel.
#2. Engine oil pretty much last forever.
#3. Fuel lasts forever over time if not used. (think genset that is only used very seldom.)
#4. Octane value.

The Bad:
#1. Energy density; gas=100% propane=66%. (mileage)
#2. Power output. (Waaaay down on power)
#3. Poor starting in cold weather. (If not impossible)
#4. High cost/energy density.
#5. Heavy tank needed.
#6. Large tank needed.
#7. Hard to find compared to gasoline.
#8. Hard on valves.
#9. Takes a long time to fuel up.
#10. Vehicle cost a lot more if duel fuel.

Pretty easy to see who wins.


A few rebuttals:

I question the power too, but this guy claims they can meet the same power output now.

Also in a DI engine I bet the valves will love it. Seen forklifts run on propane with no valve issues

Doesn't take as long as charging that F150 Lightning.
'12 Ford Super Duty FX4 ELD CC 6.7 PSD 400HP 800ft/lbs "270k Miles"
'16 Sprinter 319MKS "Wide Body"

Turtle_n_Peeps
Explorer
Explorer
Propane:

The good:
#1. Clean burning fuel.
#2. Engine oil pretty much last forever.
#3. Fuel lasts forever over time if not used. (think genset that is only used very seldom.)
#4. Octane value.

The Bad:
#1. Energy density; gas=100% propane=66%. (mileage)
#2. Power output. (Waaaay down on power)
#3. Poor starting in cold weather. (If not impossible)
#4. High cost/energy density.
#5. Heavy tank needed.
#6. Large tank needed.
#7. Hard to find compared to gasoline.
#8. Hard on valves.
#9. Takes a long time to fuel up.
#10. Vehicle cost a lot more if duel fuel.

Pretty easy to see who wins.
~ Too many freaks & not enough circuses ~


"Life is not tried ~ it is merely survived ~ if you're standing
outside the fire"

"The best way to get a bad law repealed is to enforce it strictly."- Abraham Lincoln

FishOnOne
Explorer III
Explorer III
agesilaus wrote:
Yes... But I think I would rather have this than a EV truck that maybe able to pull your camper ~100 miles at best. Plus these guys claim they're able to maintain factory power.


Dream on if you think the ----- types will let you have one of these. They are busy attacking gas stoves right now after all.


They're a bunch of azz clowns.
'12 Ford Super Duty FX4 ELD CC 6.7 PSD 400HP 800ft/lbs "270k Miles"
'16 Sprinter 319MKS "Wide Body"

ktmrfs
Explorer
Explorer
at one time around here after comparing energy density and cost and fuel economy propane was noticeably cheaper even after conversion costs for gas engines if you put 10K miles or more/year on the vehicle. Some of my co workers who had 50+ mile round trips each day did the conversion and were happy with it. You still had to pay fuel tax on the propane. But then propane got more expensive so the advantage disappeared,

For a while folks with diesel trucks were doing a conversion where propane was injected into the manifold and diesel injected into the cylinders again, for cost advantage along with longer range (but with a propane tank in the back)

Propane can tolerate a much higher compression ratio than gas before detonation, so like alcohol, you can gain power IF the engine is designed for the higher compression and can take advantage of ignition timing. That gains power and economy.

Lots of stationary power generators and big backup generators run on propane, no worry about fuel going bad and the burn so clean oil life is much longer and they are easier to start.

Then there are dual or tri fuel portable generators. My honda 2200 is modified to run on gas, propane or NG. Propane or NG does have less power, but if I need it at home if the power goes out, running on NG give an infinite run time, no worry about how much gasoline I have. Run it on gas when camping.
2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!

agesilaus
Explorer II
Explorer II
Yes... But I think I would rather have this than a EV truck that maybe able to pull your camper ~100 miles at best. Plus these guys claim they're able to maintain factory power.


Dream on if you think the ----- types will let you have one of these. They are busy attacking gas stoves right now after all.
Arctic Fox 25Y Travel Trailer
2018 RAM 2500 6.7L 4WD shortbed
Straightline dual cam hitch
400W Solar with Victron controller
Superbumper

LMHS
Explorer II
Explorer II
Schwan's Food Delivery trucks had OEM propane engines. All the drivers we had (GA, NC, SC & TN) all said the same thing. The trucks had little power. I don't know if it was due to gearing or the fuel or the engines. As for refueling, all our drivers were running routes that were far from the main depot. So they had a delivery truck that would drive out from the main depot and park until they stopped by to empty the delivery truck. They refueled at propane distributors or the satellite fill stations.

FishOnOne
Explorer III
Explorer III
agesilaus wrote:
Yawn.... Check out the energy capacity of propane vs Gasoline or Diesel. You's be cutting your driving range to a fraction of what it is currently. Or hauling around a massive and heavy, large propane tank. This as pointed out above is old tech and usable by short range vehicles only. Propane does burn very cleanly and probably improve engine life but you will pay for it.
Same applies to hydrogen plus adding hydrogen's many other problems.


Yes... But I think I would rather have this than a EV truck that maybe able to pull your camper ~100 miles at best. Plus these guys claim they're able to maintain factory power.
'12 Ford Super Duty FX4 ELD CC 6.7 PSD 400HP 800ft/lbs "270k Miles"
'16 Sprinter 319MKS "Wide Body"

agesilaus
Explorer II
Explorer II
Yawn.... Check out the energy capacity of propane vs Gasoline or Diesel. You's be cutting your driving range to a fraction of what it is currently. Or hauling around a massive and heavy, large propane tank. This as pointed out above is old tech and usable by short range vehicles only. Propane does burn very cleanly and probably improve engine life but you will pay for it.
Same applies to hydrogen plus adding hydrogen's many other problems.
Arctic Fox 25Y Travel Trailer
2018 RAM 2500 6.7L 4WD shortbed
Straightline dual cam hitch
400W Solar with Victron controller
Superbumper

ktmrfs
Explorer
Explorer
Propane gas engines as well as propane or NG diesels using a diesel to start ignition and propane/NG injected into the manifold have been around for a long time. Propane is compatible with either spark ignition or compression ignition engines.
2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!