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Pressures for LT E Tires

hayesdt
Explorer
Explorer
My 2015 F-150 came new with Passenger-rated tires, and I have been disappointed with the movement / squishiness / feeling of instability I get when towing our loaded 6500 lb. travel trailer.

So today I’m having load range E tires (up to 80 psi) put on my F-150 and not looking back. My questions are:
1. When towing my loaded 6500# travel trailer, how much air pressure should I use in the tires? and
2. How much pressure should I use when I’m not towing? I fully understand that with the E tires the ride will be rougher than my Passenger rated tires, but I’m not bothered by that.

Thanks.
DTH
2014 Ford F-150 STX, 4X4, 5.0 engine, 3.73 gearing paired with 2018 Keystone Hideout 202LHSTravel Trailer
26 REPLIES 26

Maury82
Explorer
Explorer
goducks10 wrote:
I found it easier to just buy a truck that comes with E rated tires as standard equipment. 🙂

That is easier for you, because you probably like having a big truck anyways.

Having your big truck would be more difficult for me, just as it is more easier for you.

This type of information is more important to people like me who are trying to learn a thing or two.

I have a 2018 HDPP on order, and have GY Endurance trailer tires I'm having installed, so this information is for guys like me, because I don't care for trucks unless I'm towing, but I need one to tow my trailer, and this information is the best information about towing I've read on this forum in a long time.

The information that guys like you put out, have been the worse information I've read about tow vehicle's and towing...just get a bigger truck.

Maury82
Explorer
Explorer
tragusa3 wrote:
I've been using mine for several years now (20k towing). I've always gone with 45 unloaded and 65 loaded. It has been a nice upgrade. For those that comment on why not just buy an HD truck that comes with them, there are many reasons. This option gives the stiffness I want when towing and all of the half ton advantages when not.

I would describe the improvement as noticeable, but not apples and oranges. Changing the trailer itself from "C" to "D" load range was equally as noticeable.



This type of information is hardly ever shared with newbies seeking information, instead they try to dismiss the 1/2 ton truck as not enough truck, but even as a newbie and a complete novice, can see through this bias against 1/2 tons, and pushing people into large trucks.

I'm learning a lot from thsee comments...very helpful.

riven1950
Explorer
Explorer
OP, I forgot to mention that I also upgraded the shocks to Bilsteins when I put on my E rated tires. The shocks and e rated tires are a nice upgrade.

Of course some think I should have upgraded to a diesel dually....

LarryJM
Explorer II
Explorer II
BarryG20 wrote:
Look up the load inflation tables for the tire and go from there. They pressures are based on weight and the weight listed is per tire usually not per axle so if the rear axle of your truck weighs 3500lbs that is 1750 per tire and that is weight you would use for the pressure rating

example- in link scroll down to the light truck tire section starting on page L7 and from there find your tire size it will show you the inflation pressures needed for various weights up to the tire size max psi

http://fifthwheelst.com/documents/Goodyear_Tire_Inflation___Load_Charts.pdf


Generally that is true and you definitely need to air those "puppies" down when not towing. When towing I run 80 in the rear and 65 in the front (6,000lb actual load on the rear and 4,400 on the front). When not towing my Van run around 7,000 lbs (3500 on each axle) and while the inflation tables call for around 40psi per tire I find that 50 to 55 in the rear and 45 to 50 in the front give me the best overall ride and handling. I guess I'm saying use the load tables and maybe add 5 to 10 psi above what is called for and see how that feels.

Larry
2001 standard box 7.3L E-350 PSD Van with 4.10 rear and 2007 Holiday Rambler Aluma-Lite 8306S Been RV'ing since 1974.
RAINKAP INSTALL////ETERNABOND INSTALL

Atlee
Explorer II
Explorer II
Just running the pressure that Ford put in them at the factory.

I suppose the ride could be a little softer if I let out some air, but since I pull a trailer half the time, I don't want to get out the air compressor every time I want to pull the trailer.

Grit dog wrote:
Atlee wrote:
Not exactly apples to apples, but this is what I do with my F150.

My 2014 F150 has the HD payload pkg, so it came with LT245/75R17 LRE tires.

The sticker Ford put on the door says to put 55# in the front tires and 60# in the rear tires. So that's what I keep my LRE's at.

I do not change when I hitch my 6500# trailer. The truck does just fine.


You don’t need to since you’re already running the tires higher than they need to be empty. That’s a bumpy ride though....
Erroll, Mary
2021 Coachmen Freedom Express 20SE
2014 F150 Supercab 4x4 w/ 8' box, Ecoboost & HD Pkg
Equal-i-zer Hitch

tragusa3
Explorer
Explorer
I've been using mine for several years now (20k towing). I've always gone with 45 unloaded and 65 loaded. It has been a nice upgrade. For those that comment on why not just buy an HD truck that comes with them, there are many reasons. This option gives the stiffness I want when towing and all of the half ton advantages when not.

I would describe the improvement as noticeable, but not apples and oranges. Changing the trailer itself from "C" to "D" load range was equally as noticeable.
New to us 2011 Tiffin Allegro Open Road 34TGA
Join us on the road at Rolling Ragu on YouTube!

bartlettj
Explorer
Explorer
My 2500HD rides just fine on E rated at 65 PSI, but it also weighs 7900 lbs unloaded. I prefer the way it rides and tracks compared to my Tahoe, which is very wallowy and vague on coil springs and P tires. You may decide to update your shocks at some point. I also noticed that the E tires roll significantly easier than P, presumably because they have a smaller contact patch when unloaded.

kedanie
Explorer II
Explorer II
CALandLIN wrote:
There is an industry-wide procedure for setting the recommended inflation pressures for your new tires. It’s very basic. The Original Equipment tires are the benchmark for all subsequent replacements. So, an experienced installer will ensure that the replacements are compatible with the OE wheels and that new valve stems will support the increased inflation pressures. The replacement tires, at the very minimum, MUST provide a load capacity - via inflation - equal to what the OE tires provided at the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended inflation pressures found on the vehicle tire placard, certification label and in the vehicle owner’s manual. Inflation pressures between recommended and tire sidewall max are optional.

NHTSA allows the use of an auxiliary tire placard to describe such replacement tires. The new tire size and it’s recommended cold inflation pressures should be depicted on such placard and it should be affixed adjacent to the OE placard. Notations should also be made in the vehicle owner’s manual.

Note: Inflation to the load carried is not a safe or acceptable procedure. Have you ever seen a motorized vehicle tire placard that didn’t provide some percentage of load capacity reserves for the GVWR?

So, if you want to inflate your tires like the lawyers want you too, then listen to FastEagle or CALandLIN or whatever screen name he is currently using. He just wants to sell you more ST tires.

Now, if you want to do it how the tire manufacturers suggest, get your axles weighed and set the tire pressure by the appropriate pressure/weight chart provided by the company that built the tires. It is advisable to add an additional 5psi for an adequate safety margin.

Keith
Keith and Gloria
2013 Tiffin Phaeton 36GH
2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland
USAF 1968-1976 Vietnam Veteran

mikefos
Explorer
Explorer
I run 60# in all four around town (non-towing). When towing, 70# in front, 80# in rear. Tow weight is anywhere from 8500# - 9800#. 3/4 ton Chevy CCLB, Duramax.
Mike and Kim
2012 Jayco Eagle Super Lite 308RETS, TST 507 TPMS
2010 Chevy 2500HD, Duramax/Allison, 2WD, Long Bed, Crew Cab, Duraflaps, AMP Bedstep
Equal-i-zer 1400/14K Hitch

Cummins12V98
Explorer III
Explorer III
goducks10 wrote:
I found it easier to just buy a truck that comes with E rated tires as standard equipment. 🙂


YUP, then you may not need to add bags, Timbrens and the like.

Can't get any easier than following the weight/inflation chart. Example below, every tire size and load range has one.

2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
37,800# GCVWR "Towing Beast"

"HeavyWeight" B&W RVK3600

2016 MobileSuites 39TKSB3 highly "Elited" In the stable

2007.5 Mobile Suites 36 SB3 29,000# Combined SOLD

Grit_dog
Nomad III
Nomad III
Atlee wrote:
Not exactly apples to apples, but this is what I do with my F150.

My 2014 F150 has the HD payload pkg, so it came with LT245/75R17 LRE tires.

The sticker Ford put on the door says to put 55# in the front tires and 60# in the rear tires. So that's what I keep my LRE's at.

I do not change when I hitch my 6500# trailer. The truck does just fine.


You don’t need to since you’re already running the tires higher than they need to be empty. That’s a bumpy ride though....
2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

goducks10
Explorer
Explorer
I found it easier to just buy a truck that comes with E rated tires as standard equipment. 🙂

Atlee
Explorer II
Explorer II
Not exactly apples to apples, but this is what I do with my F150.

My 2014 F150 has the HD payload pkg, so it came with LT245/75R17 LRE tires.

The sticker Ford put on the door says to put 55# in the front tires and 60# in the rear tires. So that's what I keep my LRE's at.

I do not change when I hitch my 6500# trailer. The truck does just fine.
Erroll, Mary
2021 Coachmen Freedom Express 20SE
2014 F150 Supercab 4x4 w/ 8' box, Ecoboost & HD Pkg
Equal-i-zer Hitch

APT
Explorer
Explorer
When I used LT tires on my half ton, I followed very closely to what riven1950 does. 40psi unloaded and 50-60psi loaded/towing. Tire wear was even, ride and control was great. GM recommends 50psi front and 60psi rear for my 3/4 Suburban with LT-E tires about 6500 pounds dry and 8600 pounds GVWR. I run about 5psi more than that in summer towing. It seems unlikely that any half ton needs more than 60psi.
A & A parents of DD 2005, DS1 2007, DS2 2009
2011 Suburban 2500 6.0L 3.73 pulling 2011 Heartland North Trail 28BRS
2017 Subaru Outback 3.6R
2x 2023 Chevrolet Bolt EUV (Gray and Black Twins)