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Configuration for keeping the fridge going while driving

rlraygoleta
Explorer
Explorer
Hi,
I have a 2004 Lance 845S with a Norcold fridge. It sits on a 2015 Ford F250 4x4. We have a new battery in the camper and it is equipped with solar. I have been trying to figure out the best way to set thing so the fridge will stay somewhat cold while driving. If I set the fridge to battery it does not really keep things cold and will go to low voltage when driving at night. I tried running with propane and no battery coming back from Co a couple weeks ago when it was very windy. The propane kept shutting off.
When the camper is plugged into shore power everything is fine and it also seems to work fine off the propane when sitting still.
Comments and suggestions will be much appreciated.
20 REPLIES 20

rlraygoleta
Explorer
Explorer
Thanks to all. I have cleaned everything and will be taking it out shortly to see how it goes.

tmartin000
Explorer
Explorer
rockhillmanor wrote:
We all run the fridge on propane. Usage of propane to run fridge while traveling is negligible. The flame should NOT blow out on a properly functioning unit.

You need to focus on what is making the flame blow out, repair it and you should be good to go.


This guy has good thinking skills. 🙂
2001 Lance 835. SOLD
2009 Lance 1191. SOLD
2021 Lance 1172

covered_wagon
Explorer
Explorer
rockhillmanor wrote:
I tried running with propane and no battery coming back from Co a couple weeks ago when it was very windy. The propane kept shutting off.


Here's a news flash. Your propane is not shutting off. The fridge itself is shutting off, actually 'not able to come back on'.

You need a 12v battery connection at ALL times to run an RV fridge. (except on 'some' newer models with inverters)

The "thermostat" on the RV fridge needs 12volt to function. If your fridge "works when you turn it on" and then you find out it shuts off......

It is NOT a flame problem. IT's low voltage, the fridge will come on when started but it CAN NOT come back on after it reaches the desired temp if there is low voltage coming from the battery. Not just a dead battery, if the battery 'voltage is low' the thermostat can't function so it can not 'come back' on.




Been there done that.
It was very confusing because it worked when turned on. But later would shut off.

I thought the fridge was bad but it was not. I had low voltage which prohibited the thermostat from working and it could not turn the fridge back on.

>> check the voltage coming out from your converter.

Trust me it is NOT the wind blowing out the flame! All of us have driven in a lot higher winds in all types of weather conditions and it doesn't blow the flame out~ :W


For proper advice sakes....I think most of these posters here know how to keep a battery charged while driving.

Wheelholder
Explorer
Explorer
On my first Lane, the flame would get blown out going down the road. I installed a wind blocking device inside the area where the burner resides and it cured the blow out problem. It covered most of the vent area, but sat back several inches so as not to block the normal flow. After installation of the shield, I had no more problems with the fridge flame blowing out.
2008 Silverado crew cab Duramax/Allison
2008 Lance 830

rockhillmanor
Explorer
Explorer
I tried running with propane and no battery coming back from Co a couple weeks ago when it was very windy. The propane kept shutting off.


Here's a news flash. Your propane is not shutting off. The fridge itself is shutting off, actually 'not able to come back on'.

You need a 12v battery connection at ALL times to run an RV fridge. (except on 'some' newer models with inverters)

The "thermostat" on the RV fridge needs 12volt to function. If your fridge "works when you turn it on" and then you find out it shuts off......

It is NOT a flame problem. IT's low voltage, the fridge will come on when started but it CAN NOT come back on after it reaches the desired temp if there is low voltage coming from the battery. Not just a dead battery, if the battery 'voltage is low' the thermostat can't function so it can not 'come back' on.

Been there done that.
It was very confusing because it worked when turned on. But later would shut off.

I thought the fridge was bad but it was not. I had low voltage which prohibited the thermostat from working and it could not turn the fridge back on.

>> check the voltage coming out from your converter.

Trust me it is NOT the wind blowing out the flame! All of us have driven in a lot higher winds in all types of weather conditions and it doesn't blow the flame out~ :W

We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned,
so as to have the life that is waiting for us.

JoeChiOhki
Explorer II
Explorer II
skipnchar wrote:
Check the wind deflector on the fridge and make adjustments. Probably will always be a problem unless you have DSI ignition on your fridge. With that there is no pilot light to blow out.


Modern fridges have DSI, what people call the "Pilot" is the actual burner for the fridge, it just isn't much bigger than pilot light.
My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express

CB

Channel 17

Redneck Express


'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
'1974 KIT Kamper 1106 - 11' Slide-in
'2006 Heartland BigHorn 3400RL

skipnchar
Explorer
Explorer
Check the wind deflector on the fridge and make adjustments. Probably will always be a problem unless you have DSI ignition on your fridge. With that there is no pilot light to blow out.
2011 F-150 HD Ecoboost 3.5 V6. 2550 payload, 17,100 GCVWR -
2004 F-150 HD (Traded after 80,000 towing miles)
2007 Rockwood 8314SS 34' travel trailer

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mkirsch
Nomad II
Nomad II
Depending on the age of the fridge, you may or may not need battery power. For example, the fridge in my 2000 Palomino is completely "analog."

Until the OP comes back and tells us what he has, or even what he meant by "12V disconnected" all we are doing is guessing.

Putting 10-ply tires on half ton trucks since aught-four.

JoeChiOhki
Explorer II
Explorer II
deltabravo wrote:

I will admit that I sometimes run my Fridge on AC power, but I have massive size battery cables and solar like Joe has.


Well, I have the batteries, just not the solar ;). I do it all with a 120 amp truck alternator.
My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express

CB

Channel 17

Redneck Express


'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
'1974 KIT Kamper 1106 - 11' Slide-in
'2006 Heartland BigHorn 3400RL

deltabravo
Nomad
Nomad
fla-gypsy wrote:
Hold on a second, I can set my fridge on auto on my cheap TT and drive all day without fancy inverters and solar help. The flame on mine is enclosed enough it won't blow out. You have to have a charged battery to fire the igniter. Something's wrong with this picture.


Ditto

rockhillmanor wrote:
We all run the fridge on propane. Usage of propane to run fridge while traveling is negligible. The flame should NOT blow out on a properly functioning unit.

You need to focus on what is making the flame blow out, repair it and you should be good to go.


Ditto again.

I will admit that I sometimes run my Fridge on AC power, but I have massive size battery cables and solar like Joe has.
2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2018 Arctic Fox 992 with an Onan 2500i "quiet" model generator

JoeChiOhki
Explorer II
Explorer II
rockhillmanor wrote:
We all run the fridge on propane. Usage of propane to run fridge while traveling is negligible. The flame should NOT blow out on a properly functioning unit.

You need to focus on what is making the flame blow out, repair it and you should be good to go.


Haven't figured out how to "fix" 60+ mph side gusts that aren't uncommon crossing the desert of eastern Oregon in a north-to-south direction.

I tried everything that would solve that, cleaning the thermocouple, adjusting the shutter, hell I even duct-taped over parts of the vents to try and block the wind that was getting pile driven into the side vent and down through the top vent that kept blowing it out.

For those that don't think theirs is going out, it likely is when a broadside hits, the difference is, your unit is relighting it and just simply hasn't had it happen often enough in a row to trip the fault and shut down the fridge ;).
My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express

CB

Channel 17

Redneck Express


'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
'1974 KIT Kamper 1106 - 11' Slide-in
'2006 Heartland BigHorn 3400RL

Crazy_Ray
Explorer
Explorer
You need to clean ref period
RET ARMY 1980,"Tiny" furkid, Class A, 2007 Bounder 35E, Ford V10 w/Steer Safe, 4 6V CROWN,GC235,525W Solar Kyocera, TriStar 45 Controller,Tri-Metric 2020,Yamaha 2400, TOW CRV. Ready Brake. "Living Our Dream" NASCAR #11-18-19-20- LOVE CO,NM,AZ

covered_wagon
Explorer
Explorer
I had this problem on my 13 yr Norcold. I had a weak flame so cleaned the burn tip that was full of carbon with a soft wire ss tooth brush. No more problem. I noted Wow!that's how it used to sound when new.

rockhillmanor
Explorer
Explorer
We all run the fridge on propane. Usage of propane to run fridge while traveling is negligible. The flame should NOT blow out on a properly functioning unit.

You need to focus on what is making the flame blow out, repair it and you should be good to go.

We must be willing to get rid of the life we've planned,
so as to have the life that is waiting for us.